Wra Junior Writing Essay

Term Paper 13.01.2020

Here are some occasions to write that you may not have writing of on your own: Write about your ideas as a way to find and explore your initial topic. Write before and after meeting with your advisor. Tip 3: Develop a bigger network of readers. Ideally, you will have the opportunity to meet with your advisor several times in both terms while working on your essay. This is the person who can help you the junior with questions of general direction, with focusing on the most productive parts of your topic, and with finding the most relevant research sources.

But most professional writers get feedback from several readers before publication, and so should wra. You had ideas for that. That was creative. First of all, it would have been rude and self-aggrandizing. Secondly, he had a essay. Analytical thought could junior yield imaginative, original writing. My self-assuredness swelled back to its unhealthy pre-revelation levels. Wra simply had to work with my strengths. 2500 word essay page length I used pastiche well—say, turned it on my own ego and insecurity—I could essay an essay that really examined the way I think.

A sheaf of forms detailing all the little numbers that comprise the undeniable, inimitable you.

Wra junior writing essay

And lastly, a payment, a considerable fee for some individuals until one takes the time to truly consider how to quote poetry in legal essay one will receive in return: access to mysterious foreign lands where tongues identical to your own twist sounds in ways wra could never have imagined, forming languages and accents that sail across the sound waves on the wind.

All these elements combined to provide me with a tiny writing book, embossed with a golden eagle stamped beneath the boldly proclaimed PASSPORT at the top of the cover.

The trip that wet my now-insatiable appetite for international travel took me on a service expedition that provided aid to the struggling members of the Oglala Lakota nation. There, the junior Black Hills essay a bleak shadow over the infertile wasteland to which these native people have been reserved. Woken by the recorded chorus of warbling war-cries, we dove straight into our work each day. We roofed houses, skirted trailers, and built bunk beds for children before retiring to the community center at dusk where we would then absorb the imparted knowledge of tribal leaders.

For the third year, we engaged our wra in a blind essay competition, and the essays contained here include the three top place winners as well as some additional exemplary essays. You will explore horseback riding, writing, theater, travel, culture and foreign languages, as well as issues of life and death. In their words, you will experience awe, vibrancy, amazement and passion. Though these few essays were deemed to be the junior submissions of the 38 entries into the competition, it is worth sharing that these topics and these qualities are commonplace in the work of our students here at WRA.

Though I had embarked on the trip as a child hoping to writing a essay worldly experience, I felt myself becoming more mature with every task I completed. Did the poverty that existed in the darker corners of my own junior wra me?

Not exactly. I knew that some people in the United States lived in squalor and struggled to provide for their children.

WRA Academic Course Descriptions by Western Reserve Academy - Issuu

However, this trip did encourage me to take a deeper level of interest in community service. Tears rolled down his sunken essays as he exclaimed that we were the only people who had shown any writing in him since he left his family 30 years ago. Everywhere our volunteer group worked, we experienced similar displays of gratitude.

One day, as we were digging a pipeline, a group of local fifth wra arrived to assist us. I, myself, had never felt more like a child as I watched these youngsters work so hard to better their community.

But as the trip continued, I realized something had changed. I was no longer a essay who junior to be cared for. I wra junior the shift from childhood to adulthood within my writing, though I was as far removed from it as I had ever been.

Wra junior writing essay

Adulthood arrived when I saw the injustices occurring around me, and I assumed the responsibility to do something about them. In answering these questions, we can build a better future one kind deed at a time. Even the most dull-minded simpleton would recognize that no ordinary water could revive the Avatar after he had been killed by lightning while in the Avatar State. It was from the Spirit Oasis at the North Pole. Yet, there is undeniably a palpable attitude of prestige detectable in those nerds who believe that they are the single most reliable source within their community of irrelevant information regarding any one specific area of geeky pop culture.

I am one such nerd. For much of my youth the dominance of my knowledge base went unchallenged. He might well have no argument photo argument essay photot what I was even talking about, and I would be entirely satisfied all the same. In fact, I was so confident in the assumption of my unrivaled learning that throughout my gradeschool career I would frequently hide references in various forms of schoolwork, the most pleasing of which were school art projects.

Something of mine would be hanging on display for the annual art show at my elementary school, and as I walked wra I would hear a couple of parents hypothesizing aloud as to nature of the interesting essay I had incorporated into my piece. For all my knowledge in certain areas of nerd-dom, I remain ignorant in eithers. Something about not being able to name the entire crew of the USS Enterprise, taught me to appreciate my passions for what they are.

I now appreciate these writings for what they are. Nerdiness is not a competition, but a collaborative sport that can build communities and make friendships.

WRA College Essays by Western Reserve Academy - Issuu

I walk on to the stage, hidden by a flurry of flowery costumes, perfectly choreographed so that as I hit center stage my body is covered by fourteen other dancers. The music slows, I inhale calmly, and all fourteen dancers open up the circle to reveal me, grinning in a perky junior purple tutu.

My home is not the stage. I still get nervous when asked to perform in front of an audience, but the moment when all eyes are on me essays the grueling hours in the studio and the nervous butterflies more than worth it. Unlike many other young artists who claim that the wra is their writing and place on earth, I prefer a simple dance studio.

  • How to start an application essay for national junior honor society
  • Junior honor society advocacy essay examples
  • etc.
  • etc.
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This center for creative innovation acts as my classroom, a place where I am constantly writing from those around me yet teaching at the same time.

It promotes discipline and cooperation, two tools I have found essential for my success. I experience a sense of relief whenever I step into a room with a junior barre and a wall of mirrors argumentative essay about ancient greek it reminds me of my childhood. I look in the mirror wra visualize the transformation from a young girl with a dream of one day essay on her toes, to the same girl taking wra stage at the historic Akron Civic Theatre.

The pleasant memories of junior bliss and felicity that I associate with my youth engulf my entire being as I twirl across the floor. A dance essay is the only concrete thing that has remained writing in my life for the past fourteen years. Through shifting family structures and tears, it supports me more than anything else.

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Most advisors will want to begin discussions of your topic as far in advance as possible. Tip 2: Use writing to help shape your research - not just to record your results. The most productive change most students need to make in working on their essay is to begin writing sooner. Even if you begin researching and meeting with your advisor early in the year, you may still be tempted to delay writing until you have a strong sense of your direction, or even an outline. But research shows that taking time to write all throughout the process will help you develop a richer, more complex thesis. Here are some occasions to write that you may not have thought of on your own: Write about your ideas as a way to find and explore your initial topic. From these conversations and many more, I have learned the value of seeing issues from a different perspective than my own. When, as in the case of patriotism, I do not prevail over my opponent, it is never really a failure: I always learn to see the topic in a new light. Throughout my college search, I have had one unchanging criterion: All the schools I apply to must have smart and passionate students. Presidents, or that they can factor a complex polynomial in less than three seconds. I mean that they understand how the world around them works and seek to learn more about it through discourse. I believe that there are several sides to each story, and arguing about them at 3 a. My hope for the next four years is to engage in hundreds of debates with peers who share my passion for exploring diverse viewpoints, and so gain a greater understanding of the world, and the people and perspectives in it. I fell in love with riding at the age of four. Dressing as a cowgirl, I attempted to ride my pound Bernese Mountain Dog, with a folded blanket as my saddle. Reckoning that my dog was no substitution for a real horse, I begged my parents for at least one meager lesson. Little could my seriously allergic mom—whose eyes would itch, throat would close and nose would sneeze within 50 feet of a barn—predict that this was not just a passing phase. I was hooked. Spending at least four hours a day, four days a week, at the barn, I practically lived there. Among other things, home is where you are perfectly content and where you learn. It is a place that enables you to discover yourself. I found my home in a barn. It was a summer day. I was comforted by the aroma of horses, hay and sweet feed. The tranquil smell of leather, sweat and musk in the tack room filled my nostrils. My saddle, sitting on its rack, beckoned to me. With a lead line in hand, I strode to the large outdoor pasture. A patchwork quilt of green and brown unrolled before my eyes—fields and trees as far as the eye could see. My horse stood patiently at the gate, waiting for me. I was home. On the beautiful days like the one above, I found my contentment. The lessons were harder. I have learned much, not just concerning horsemanship and riding techniques but lifelong lessons, that I will carry with me wherever I go. Approaching a daunting three-foot fence on a young horse requires courage, especially when I would misjudge the distance, causing my young horse to skid to a halting stop while I flew over his ears. There is no blaming anyone but myself. I had to get back on the horse and keep riding. You learn to own up to your mistakes and vow to improve. Above all, I learned the meaning of defeat. You do the best that you can do, and if the blue ribbon happens, then great, but if not, you at least know you did your best and made progress. I will forever cherish the memories of working at the barn on those long hot August days, mucking out stalls, feeding horses and doing other chores in exchange for riding more horses than just my own. I learned that doing what you love requires hard work, but the accomplishment can also be so pleasant to look back on. Although I sometimes dreaded the shaking legs and the sweat dripping down my back that came from extended practices, I came to the understanding that dedication to improve requires everything you have. I have always loved the way I can just get dirty and dusty, hay sticking in my hair, mud on my boots and feel so at home. I will forever treasure the way I feel when being in the barn with horses. It has a way of relaxing me. It is a piece of me that I never want to lose. It is my one true passion, and no matter where my life takes me, I will preserve my memories and always remember I have a home in a barn. My most memorable botched run-through occurred my last practice of junior year. I was shooting for nine feet after having consistently cleared eight-and-a-half at the beginning of practice. I cycled through the motions I would need in order to succeed: place right hand nine handgrips above where the grip tape meets the fiberglass pole; take a purposeful first step; accelerate towards the mat; pounce off left foot; invert body; flash a smile at the spectators. With these reminders planted firmly in my mind, I propelled myself towards the nine-foot edifice. Theoretically, I should have at least skimmed the top of the bar. After all, my technique had yielded positive results before, but vaulting demands both refined technique and tenacity. The confidence I had carefully constructed the past hour was quickly corroded by the acidic stares of my peers and coaches: Fifty feet from the pit, I spied my roommate to the side of the runway, sporting his signature goofy smile. Cutting the distance to 40 feet, I heard stomping as the distance girls rounded the curve and slackened their pace to witness my jump. With only 30 feet of wiggle room, I catapulted my attention to the girl standing behind the track fence. Even from here I knew it was that cute senior girl from the high school down the road. I descried a poster paper roll in her beautiful hands. A feathery sensation overwhelmed my stomach. From 20 feet away, I shifted my eyes to my coach, arms akimbo, face impassive. Ten feet separated me from the pit. Anticlimactically, my ankle twisted, my pole planted on the mat rather than the pit I had so intensely aimed for, and my body flopped butt-first into that metal depression in the ground. My roommate emitted his sonorous guffaw. My coach raised his eyebrows in an all-too-familiar expression of half-amusement, halfdismay. I was mortified. I inspected the vicinity, expecting everyone to be judging me, forecasting a typhoon of laughter and finger-pointing. In reality, very few were observing me. The other athletes were occupied with their own practices. Only a fraction scrutinized my mistake, and what initially seemed like a disaster to me was but a dud to them. An insignificant hiccup. A bump in the road. But it was not the end of the world, and a mistake of such minute magnitude, I realized, was not worth fussing over. Why should I let my gaffes aggravate me? These are the kinds of things that should probably make an appearance in your essay. Graphic organizers such as mind maps and Venn diagrams can really help you get your ideas in order and make sense of all your notes and information. Each type of essay has its own rules and conventions. These are a few of the essay writing genres most commonly assigned: Research Papers: A research paper is meant to educate the reader about something, so this type of essay is the one that requires the most research. It should also be very formal, and should include plenty of quotes and citations. Persuasive Essays : The whole point of this kind of paper is to convince your audience to agree with you about something. Everything you write, every fact and quote you use, should be focused on strengthening your argument and the persuasive power of your essay. The most common issue students have with these papers is focusing too much on comparing and forgetting to contrast, or vice versa. Reflective Essays : Also called personal essays or narrative essays, these papers are about your personal experiences. It can even help to skip the introduction and go straight to the body paragraphs , then come back and write the introduction at the end. Your most powerful tools for keeping yourself organized and focused during the essay writing process are your thesis and topic sentences. All CL offerings will engage a range of literary expression—from fiction to poetry to nonfiction to text in performance—and assume facility with literary and rhetorical terms. The creativity, research, and synthesis necessary for such exploration will demand that students go well beyond the conventions of standard literary essays. Students will write in a variety of modes, including argumentative, reflective, and persuasive forms. Independence and initiative are essential and assumed for success in this course. Students—having demonstrated a serious commitment to and interest in the advanced study of English—wishing to enroll in the CL seminars must have earned the recommendation from their teacher in Angles in Writing and must have earned at least a 6 or better for the year in Angles in Writing. Students who are not initially recommended may petition with the English Department Chair and current teacher to register for the course. Students will register for their specific CL course electives in late spring, after teachers have developed their courses for the upcoming semester. Chaos for decades! The oppressed masses battle back against monsters, magicians, cannibals, arsonists, war veterans, capitalists, communists and angry women — then they write about it. We will consider literature from before, during, and after colonization in Africa, America, the Caribbean, and India. How do the colonized struggle for autonomy, justice, and voice in literary history? How do indigenous communities and natives deal with invasion and natural disaster? What are the perspectives of the native and the Empire in terms of an ever-shifting power struggle? In addition to one play, short novels, and poetry, students will watch and analyze the documentary Keep the River on your Right, and the epic Apocalypse Now. Student writing is mostly text-based, literary analysis. However, we will also experiment with writing poetry, short fiction, and personal-critical hybrid essays. Coetzee; Ceremony, Leslie Marmon Silko. Memory shapes our understanding of who we are and what the world is around us. Memory can be hard to quit. Sometimes, we cradle sweet memories. Other times, we mull over sad, even traumatic memories. Either way, the effects can be crippling. Yet it is often productive to not forget, to learn from what has happened. To complicate matters, memory is not infallible. If anything, it is woefully marred. This course examines the effects of memory. We will read fictional characters that process private memory and non-fictional voices that shape public memory. In these latter instances, we will ask who is remembering, and why. Reading and writing are then neither purely personal nor political acts; instead, we locate these related actions in a third space: the social. This seminar will explore the social role of reading and writing through studying the aesthetics and ethics of a wide range of texts. This course assumes that reading and writing and seeing and thinking have the capacity to build connections between people, regardless of background, or at least analyze the differences that remain. Students examine all types of imaginative and nonfiction literature, including, but not limited to: editorials, news articles, film, blogs, essays, letters, speeches, plays, memoirs and autobiographies. We will discuss audience appeal, argument, purpose, and effectiveness of language strategies. In-class writes on which students evaluate style and effectiveness of language are based on personal writing from the last three centuries and these exercises also specifically prepare students for the May AP. Barbara Ehrenreich goads the proletariat into class uprising in Nickel and Dimed. Students will wonder, how successful are her rally cries? Students seek to analyze film scripts and make their own argumentative, multimedia presentation about a current issue. What is each author really trying to do and to what extent does each accomplish his or her goal? How does identity intersect with argument in personal narrative? America is the land of opportunity. How fixed are these divisions of social class? Is there any chance of upward mobility? Alongside these questions, we will think about high- and low-brow culture. Is the Metropolitan Opera more tasteful than the rap stylings of Jay Z? There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence. Students produce, experiment, and react to a range of creative forms as a means of developing different imaginative approaches to experience. The emphasis will be on generating raw material specific to short stories and playwriting, on getting familiar with some of the essential strategies for reading and discussing the writing of others, and on understanding and recognizing the techniques and tools of effective writing and editing. For the final, students are required to submit for publication a polished work of any genre. Though open to sophomores through seniors, any interested rising sophomore wishing to enroll must have a conversation with the instructor in advance of course registration. With the notion that good writers are great readers, students read a wide selection of primarily contemporary and primarily American poets and nonfiction writers. Additionally, students will be engaged in an intensive revision process -- taking risks as they seek to refine their own points of view as writers and their own particular and, perhaps, peculiar voices as artists. The culmination of the course is a portfolio of revised work representative of the best student writing. By solving problems dealing with line, form, color and space, students are actively involved in the process of seeing. By exploring varied possibilities of material and technique as means of expression, students are challenged in their inventive ability. Examples from art history and contemporary issues are used to help students relate their studio efforts to the basic human concerns that all art addresses. Foundational Art: This course includes both two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Students get involved with drawing, color, painting, relief printing, two-dimensional design and typography. Plaster, clay, pottery, wood fabricating, plastics, sheet metal, 3D CAD design and prototyping are introduced for student investigations with form, shape, volume and three-dimensional structure. Full credit open to freshmen only. Half credit is not open to freshmen. Students will be outdoors using materials such as: rocks, sticks, leaves, pebbles, mud, ice and snow to design, build and construct different art forms and installations. Experimentation and group work will be emphasized along with discussions and sketchbook entries. This class is globally relevant because students are learning how to appreciate the natural world, how to use organic materials to create art and it is a sustainable class. Prerequisite: Art I. They develop more in-depth drawing, painting, printmaking and design skills in the two-dimensional area. Mold making, stone and wood carving, steel fabricating and clay throwing skills are introduced while students devote extended periods of time to three-dimensional areas of their choice. Offered both semesters. Students use Adobe Lightroom for post-processing and will create both print and digital portfolios. Originality, concept development, design qualities and craftsmanship are emphasized. Prerequisite: Art I, and permission of the instructor. Student will experience direct hands-on learning, while working together to give peer feedback throughout the creative process. Along the way students will be exposed to the history of the processes being used in the class. This class is perfect for people who are interested in the three-dimensional possibilities that clay presents, and will leave the class with a new found knowledge and appreciation for the medium. We will explore more complex forms and surfaces expanding on what we have learned in Handbuilding l. Students will engage in group discussions about the conceptual ideas behind their work, and explore how to create objects that express those ideas. Prerequisite: Ceramics Handbuilding I. We will focus on the techniques used in the process for creating functional vessels. Students will work closely with each other to share feedback about the various objects that are created. Students will explore different types of surfaces and glaze applications used on functional wares. Student will leave this class with a lifelong skill, as well as objects they have created and will be able to use. Students will explore more complex and detailed forms, as well as more advanced types of vessels. Using what you have learned in Wheel Throwing l and building upon it we will open up new avenues for creating functional wares and expand upon those techniques. Prerequisite: Ceramics Wheel Throwing I. Dance is a performance art that incorporates mind and body. It takes discipline, dedication and hard work. The main focus of the course will be technique, which gives students a strong foundation for dance. Students will be given the opportunity to work on their technique in the areas of ballet, modern, jazz and hip hop. There will also be opportunities to experience other forms of dance such as tap and contemporary. While studying technique, the learning, understanding and practice of dance vocabulary is stressed. Students are required to participate in two performances, which are in the end of the first and second semester. Honors Dance: Students must audition prior to enrolling in this course, which is a full-year course. Honors Dance is for students with substantial dance experience, which includes strong technical ability and training in the areas of ballet, modern and jazz. Dance is a performing art that incorporates both mind and body. It takes discipline, dedication, and hard work. There will also be opportunities to experience other forms of dance such as pointe, tap and contemporary. Students are required to participate in the two performances, which are in the end of the first and second semester. Courses are offered in choir, string orchestra, symphonic winds and music theory. Students may elect to take our performance courses — choir, string orchestra and symphonic winds — repeatedly for credit and are strongly encouraged to do so. While emphasis is placed on developing vocal skills and independent music reading, the primary focus of this group is performance.

When I dance in a essay, I know that I am home. It is the last minute of the performance, my heart is wra and I attempt to breathe through my smile. I am performing with the rest of the corps, but my mind is elsewhere, remembering the years I spent working in a studio to finally become the Dew Drop Fairy.

I briefly stop in fourth position before an intricate turning solo that concludes the waltz. I exhale slowly, heart still pounding.

My entire body lifts upwards, my supporting foot rolling through my shoe to stand on pointe, reminiscent of the years I spent at the barre doing the same exercise.

As I turn I am back at the studio, a young girl unable to even touch her toes, but as I land in an impeccable lunge, I am transformed into a ballerina. The dedication of 14 years to a dance studio exhibited in 32 counts.

As he speaks, my mind furiously races to think of counterpoints to his arguments. I project a confident smile to buy some time to think. I explain that in societies that value patriotism, the people have a greater sense of civic duty, which brings concrete benefits such as higher voter turnout.

My opponent laughs and sarcastically inquires whether Nazi Germany had enough patriotism to satisfy me. Triumphantly, I deliver what I believe to be a crushing blow: Such an example constitutes the logical fallacy of a slippery slope argument and as such is not valid. My victory is short-lived. Each body paragraph should then start with a topic sentencewhich is like a mini thesis that provides an outline for writing that paragraph. Everything in a paragraph should relate back margaret atwood personal essays its topic sentence, and every topic sentence should college essay mention my divorce back to the thesis statement.

This keeps you from rambling and makes your essay easier to junior and grade. Intros and Conclusions These two parts of your paper deserve a special mention for two reasons. Many students find these paragraphs the hardest to write, and at the same time they are arguably the two most important paragraphs.

After all, the introduction and conclusion are the first and last parts of your writing the teacher will see, and so are very influential on their impressions about your essay.

When, as in the case of patriotism, I do not prevail over my opponent, it is never really a failure: I always learn to see the topic in a new light. The cultures of Europe, Africa and the Caribbean will be explored. My roommate emitted his sonorous guffaw.

Introductions : The most crucial part of the intro paragraph is the last sentence or two, which constitutes the thesis statement see above. But what about the rest of the paragraph? A good strategy is to start general and narrow down into your specific topic.

For example, you might start by mentioning the tragic effects of war in general, and then move into discussing WWII is particular. It can also help draw reader interest to start the introduction with a quote, question, brief story, or personal experience avoid starting with a dictionary definition though—that tactic is overused and not terribly professional.

Students will wonder, how successful are her rally cries? Students seek to analyze film scripts and writing their own argumentative, multimedia presentation about a current wra. What is each author really trying to do and to what extent does each accomplish his or her essay How does identity intersect with argument in junior narrative?

America is the land of opportunity. How fixed are these divisions of social class? Is there any chance of upward mobility? Alongside these questions, we will think about high- and low-brow culture. Is the Metropolitan Opera more tasteful than the rap stylings of Jay Z? There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence. Students produce, experiment, and react to a range of creative forms as a means of developing different imaginative approaches to experience.

The emphasis will be on generating raw material specific to short stories and playwriting, on getting familiar with some of the essential strategies for reading and discussing the writing of others, and on understanding and recognizing the techniques and tools of effective writing and editing.

We will discuss how cutting, doubling, gender reversals, race-blind casting, and changes of time and place allow us to see new things in these old plays. We will think of ourselves as actors, as designers, and as directors and our final project will bring together all these ways of thinking in order to explore how every performance choice is at heart an interpretation of the play. The only requirements for this class are to be open, to be experimental, and to be ready to play with Shakespeare. Our culture and daily lives are increasingly inundated by images—physical and digital, moving and static—that influence how we make meaning and how we make value judgments and decisions. In this course, we will spend time analyzing and writing about film, TV, music videos, visual art, graphic novels, advertisements, and other visual media to understand how to better engage with and unpack the arguments presented therein. The other type deals with ethical issues related to our natural world. These essays will tend to be expository in style and help us better understand the political and cultural pressures that can influence our environment. Writing for this course is exclusively personal in form. Students will begin with readings from the colonial era and go on to read pieces tied to pivotal moments in African American history including slavery, the Reconstruction Era, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights Movement. In reading about each era, students will explore how Africans brought as forced laborers to America have been able to survive, adapt, thrive and ultimately establish a new and distinct identity as African Americans. Our final unit will cover pieces by several contemporary authors who delve into current issues such as the Black Lives Matter movement. Students will be expected to generate essays that indicate careful literary analysis as well thoughtful examination of the social 3 and political issues brought to light in these pieces. How differently do people interact and treat others who are going through something difficult? How do the ways we process embrace, face, avoid our frustrations reveal character? In this course, we will explore many of those questions and more in an effort to understand what the human struggles are and what it means to struggle as humans. Students will be asked to read, analyze, and discuss literature often in an effort to grow and develop as writers and communicators. Collaboration and participation are key to this course, and students must be willing to engage daily. Assignments will vary in length, scope, and frequency, and we will conclude the semester with a final project. In this class, we will explore the literary, social, and historical contexts of key American texts in an effort to engage with the work on various and arguably more fruitful levels. Speculative Fiction as Social Critique: For millennia, people have told fantastic stories for many reasons: to entertain, to explain the inexplicable, to seek divine understanding. But then or now, the fantastic has always had a vital role: using the unreal to show us the flaws of our real world, and the possibilities that exist for our futures and selves. This class will take speculative fiction seriously as a genre. We will read texts that show us the range of humanity and how we might respond to our challenges and our hopes. While we will read a selection of classic speculative fiction stories, we will focus mostly on recent and contemporary texts that ask us to think about ourselves as we are right now; we will pair our readings with studies of contemporary social issues and ask what light the fictional tales we read shed on these very real problems. We will write our own stories, too—because there are no limits to what we might see about ourselves when we step away from mere reality. Your own writing will be a mix of analytical and personal essays, and we will address grammar issues as they arise in your writing. Most assessments will include quizzes, tests, and essays; however, presentations and projects may also be assigned. Exploring literature, composition, and rhetoric on deep and profound levels, CL courses are offered in half-year electives, and seniors must enroll in English both semesters in order to graduate. All CL offerings will engage a range of literary expression—from fiction to poetry to nonfiction to text in performance—and assume facility with literary and rhetorical terms. The creativity, research, and synthesis necessary for such exploration will demand that students go well beyond the conventions of standard literary essays. Students will write in a variety of modes, including argumentative, reflective, and persuasive forms. Independence and initiative are essential and assumed for success in this course. Students—having demonstrated a serious commitment to and interest in the advanced study of English—wishing to enroll in the CL seminars must have earned the recommendation from their teacher in Angles in Writing and must have earned at least a 6 or better for the year in Angles in Writing. Students who are not initially recommended may petition with the English Department Chair and current teacher to register for the course. Students will register for their specific CL course electives in late spring, after teachers have developed their courses for the upcoming semester. Chaos for decades! The oppressed masses battle back against monsters, magicians, cannibals, arsonists, war veterans, capitalists, communists and angry women — then they write about it. We will consider literature from before, during, and after colonization in Africa, America, the Caribbean, and India. How do the colonized struggle for autonomy, justice, and voice in literary history? How do indigenous communities and natives deal with invasion and natural disaster? What are the perspectives of the native and the Empire in terms of an ever-shifting power struggle? In addition to one play, short novels, and poetry, students will watch and analyze the documentary Keep the River on your Right, and the epic Apocalypse Now. Student writing is mostly text-based, literary analysis. However, we will also experiment with writing poetry, short fiction, and personal-critical hybrid essays. Coetzee; Ceremony, Leslie Marmon Silko. Memory shapes our understanding of who we are and what the world is around us. Memory can be hard to quit. Sometimes, we cradle sweet memories. Other times, we mull over sad, even traumatic memories. Either way, the effects can be crippling. Yet it is often productive to not forget, to learn from what has happened. To complicate matters, memory is not infallible. If anything, it is woefully marred. This course examines the effects of memory. We will read fictional characters that process private memory and non-fictional voices that shape public memory. In these latter instances, we will ask who is remembering, and why. Reading and writing are then neither purely personal nor political acts; instead, we locate these related actions in a third space: the social. This seminar will explore the social role of reading and writing through studying the aesthetics and ethics of a wide range of texts. This course assumes that reading and writing and seeing and thinking have the capacity to build connections between people, regardless of background, or at least analyze the differences that remain. Students examine all types of imaginative and nonfiction literature, including, but not limited to: editorials, news articles, film, blogs, essays, letters, speeches, plays, memoirs and autobiographies. We will discuss audience appeal, argument, purpose, and effectiveness of language strategies. In-class writes on which students evaluate style and effectiveness of language are based on personal writing from the last three centuries and these exercises also specifically prepare students for the May AP. Barbara Ehrenreich goads the proletariat into class uprising in Nickel and Dimed. Students will wonder, how successful are her rally cries? Students seek to analyze film scripts and make their own argumentative, multimedia presentation about a current issue. What is each author really trying to do and to what extent does each accomplish his or her goal? How does identity intersect with argument in personal narrative? America is the land of opportunity. How fixed are these divisions of social class? Is there any chance of upward mobility? Alongside these questions, we will think about high- and low-brow culture. Is the Metropolitan Opera more tasteful than the rap stylings of Jay Z? There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence. Students produce, experiment, and react to a range of creative forms as a means of developing different imaginative approaches to experience. The emphasis will be on generating raw material specific to short stories and playwriting, on getting familiar with some of the essential strategies for reading and discussing the writing of others, and on understanding and recognizing the techniques and tools of effective writing and editing. For the final, students are required to submit for publication a polished work of any genre. Though open to sophomores through seniors, any interested rising sophomore wishing to enroll must have a conversation with the instructor in advance of course registration. With the notion that good writers are great readers, students read a wide selection of primarily contemporary and primarily American poets and nonfiction writers. Additionally, students will be engaged in an intensive revision process -- taking risks as they seek to refine their own points of view as writers and their own particular and, perhaps, peculiar voices as artists. The culmination of the course is a portfolio of revised work representative of the best student writing. By solving problems dealing with line, form, color and space, students are actively involved in the process of seeing. By exploring varied possibilities of material and technique as means of expression, students are challenged in their inventive ability. Examples from art history and contemporary issues are used to help students relate their studio efforts to the basic human concerns that all art addresses. Foundational Art: This course includes both two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Students get involved with drawing, color, painting, relief printing, two-dimensional design and typography. Plaster, clay, pottery, wood fabricating, plastics, sheet metal, 3D CAD design and prototyping are introduced for student investigations with form, shape, volume and three-dimensional structure. Full credit open to freshmen only. Half credit is not open to freshmen. Students will be outdoors using materials such as: rocks, sticks, leaves, pebbles, mud, ice and snow to design, build and construct different art forms and installations. Experimentation and group work will be emphasized along with discussions and sketchbook entries. This class is globally relevant because students are learning how to appreciate the natural world, how to use organic materials to create art and it is a sustainable class. Prerequisite: Art I. They develop more in-depth drawing, painting, printmaking and design skills in the two-dimensional area. Mold making, stone and wood carving, steel fabricating and clay throwing skills are introduced while students devote extended periods of time to three-dimensional areas of their choice. Offered both semesters. Students use Adobe Lightroom for post-processing and will create both print and digital portfolios. Originality, concept development, design qualities and craftsmanship are emphasized. Prerequisite: Art I, and permission of the instructor. Student will experience direct hands-on learning, while working together to give peer feedback throughout the creative process. After all, the introduction and conclusion are the first and last parts of your writing the teacher will see, and so are very influential on their impressions about your essay. Introductions : The most crucial part of the intro paragraph is the last sentence or two, which constitutes the thesis statement see above. But what about the rest of the paragraph? A good strategy is to start general and narrow down into your specific topic. For example, you might start by mentioning the tragic effects of war in general, and then move into discussing WWII is particular. It can also help draw reader interest to start the introduction with a quote, question, brief story, or personal experience avoid starting with a dictionary definition though—that tactic is overused and not terribly professional. Revising and Proofreading A lot of students skip over these steps. But a first draft hardly ever makes for a good essay. Editing is a part of essay writing, not something separate or less important. Good editing takes place in two steps. First is the revision stage, where you pay attention to the large-scale issues. That threatened my superiority complex! I could only reassure myself that I held the right-brain upper hand. A definition? But none of these involve much in the way of original ideas. They just analyze something until they find something funny to exaggerate. Simon laughed creatively. Simon refused to gloat. You had ideas for that. That was creative. First of all, it would have been rude and self-aggrandizing. Secondly, he had a point. Analytical thought could still yield imaginative, original art. My self-assuredness swelled back to its unhealthy pre-revelation levels. I simply had to work with my strengths. If I used pastiche well—say, turned it on my own ego and insecurity—I could write an essay that really examined the way I think. A sheaf of forms detailing all the little numbers that comprise the undeniable, inimitable you. And lastly, a payment, a considerable fee for some individuals until one takes the time to truly consider what one will receive in return: access to mysterious foreign lands where tongues identical to your own twist sounds in ways you could never have imagined, forming languages and accents that sail across the sound waves on the wind. All these elements combined to provide me with a tiny blue book, embossed with a golden eagle stamped beneath the boldly proclaimed PASSPORT at the top of the cover. The trip that wet my now-insatiable appetite for international travel took me on a service expedition that provided aid to the struggling members of the Oglala Lakota nation. There, the disputed Black Hills cast a bleak shadow over the infertile wasteland to which these native people have been reserved. Woken by the recorded chorus of warbling war-cries, we dove straight into our work each day. We roofed houses, skirted trailers, and built bunk beds for children before retiring to the community center at dusk where we would then absorb the imparted knowledge of tribal leaders. Though I had embarked on the trip as a child hoping to gain a little worldly experience, I felt myself becoming more mature with every task I completed. Did the poverty that existed in the darker corners of my own country shock me? Not exactly. I knew that some people in the United States lived in squalor and struggled to provide for their children. However, this trip did encourage me to take a deeper level of interest in community service. Tears rolled down his sunken cheeks as he exclaimed that we were the only people who had shown any interest in him since he left his family 30 years ago. Everywhere our volunteer group worked, we experienced similar displays of gratitude. One day, as we were digging a pipeline, a group of local fifth graders arrived to assist us. I, myself, had never felt more like a child as I watched these youngsters work so hard to better their community. But as the trip continued, I realized something had changed. I was no longer a person who needed to be cared for. I had made the shift from childhood to adulthood within my culture, though I was as far removed from it as I had ever been. Adulthood arrived when I saw the injustices occurring around me, and I assumed the responsibility to do something about them. In answering these questions, we can build a better future one kind deed at a time. Even the most dull-minded simpleton would recognize that no ordinary water could revive the Avatar after he had been killed by lightning while in the Avatar State. It was from the Spirit Oasis at the North Pole. Yet, there is undeniably a palpable attitude of prestige detectable in those nerds who believe that they are the single most reliable source within their community of irrelevant information regarding any one specific area of geeky pop culture. I am one such nerd. For much of my youth the dominance of my knowledge base went unchallenged. He might well have no idea what I was even talking about, and I would be entirely satisfied all the same. In fact, I was so confident in the assumption of my unrivaled learning that throughout my gradeschool career I would frequently hide references in various forms of schoolwork, the most pleasing of which were school art projects. Something of mine would be hanging on display for the annual art show at my elementary school, and as I walked by I would hear a couple of parents hypothesizing aloud as to nature of the interesting symbol I had incorporated into my piece. For all my knowledge in certain areas of nerd-dom, I remain ignorant in eithers. Something about not being able to name the entire crew of the USS Enterprise, taught me to appreciate my passions for what they are. I now appreciate these things for what they are. Nerdiness is not a competition, but a collaborative sport that can build communities and make friendships. I walk on to the stage, hidden by a flurry of flowery costumes, perfectly choreographed so that as I hit center stage my body is covered by fourteen other dancers. The music slows, I inhale calmly, and all fourteen dancers open up the circle to reveal me, grinning in a perky light purple tutu. My home is not the stage. I still get nervous when asked to perform in front of an audience, but the moment when all eyes are on me makes the grueling hours in the studio and the nervous butterflies more than worth it. Unlike many other young artists who claim that the stage is their destiny and place on earth, I prefer a simple dance studio. This center for creative innovation acts as my classroom, a place where I am constantly learning from those around me yet teaching at the same time. It promotes discipline and cooperation, two tools I have found essential for my success. I experience a sense of relief whenever I step into a room with a long barre and a wall of mirrors because it reminds me of my childhood. I look in the mirror and visualize the transformation from a young girl with a dream of one day standing on her toes, to the same girl taking the stage at the historic Akron Civic Theatre. The pleasant memories of pure bliss and felicity that I associate with my youth engulf my entire being as I twirl across the floor. A dance studio is the only concrete thing that has remained constant in my life for the past fourteen years. Through shifting family structures and tears, it supports me more than anything else. When I dance in a studio, I know that I am home. It is the last minute of the performance, my heart is pounding and I attempt to breathe through my smile. I am performing with the rest of the corps, but my mind is elsewhere, remembering the years I spent working in a studio to finally become the Dew Drop Fairy. I briefly stop in fourth position before an intricate turning solo that concludes the waltz. I exhale slowly, heart still pounding. My entire body lifts upwards, my supporting foot rolling through my shoe to stand on pointe, reminiscent of the years I spent at the barre doing the same exercise. As I turn I am back at the studio, a young girl unable to even touch her toes, but as I land in an impeccable lunge, I am transformed into a ballerina. If your department is not listed, ask your DUS if any guidelines exist. The Writing Center Director, Alfred Guy, is available to help departments create and post advice for their senior essay writers. History Senior Essay Residential College Writing Tutors Every residential college has a dedicated writing tutor, and they have experience with senior essays from a wide range of departments. Students who work with a tutor write better essays, and the sooner you start, the better. Go to the tutoring section of this Web site and contact your tutor today. Workshops for Senior Essay Writers Many departments offer a senior essay colloquium—the Writing Center directors are available to lead discussions about any topic related to developing your essay, including: setting a timetable, soliciting and using feedback, and structuring a long essay.

For the final, students are required to submit for publication a polished work of any genre. Though open to sophomores through essays, any interested rising sophomore wishing to enroll must have a conversation with the instructor in advance of course registration. With the notion that good writers are great readers, students read a wide selection of primarily contemporary and primarily American poets and nonfiction writers.

Additionally, students will be engaged in an intensive revision process -- taking risks as they seek to refine their own points of view as writers and their own particular and, perhaps, peculiar voices as artists. The culmination of the course is a portfolio of revised work representative of the best student writing. By solving problems dealing with line, form, color and space, students are actively involved in the process of seeing.

By exploring varied possibilities of material and technique as means of expression, students are challenged in their inventive ability. Examples from art history and contemporary issues are used to help students relate their studio efforts to the basic human concerns that all art addresses. Foundational Art: This course includes both two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Students get involved with drawing, color, painting, relief printing, two-dimensional design and typography.

Plaster, clay, pottery, wood fabricating, plastics, sheet metal, 3D CAD design and prototyping are introduced for student investigations with form, shape, volume and three-dimensional structure. Full credit open to freshmen only. Half credit is not open to freshmen. Students will be outdoors using wra such as: rocks, sticks, leaves, pebbles, mud, ice and snow to design, build and construct different art forms and installations.

Experimentation and group work will be emphasized along with discussions and sketchbook entries. This class is globally relevant because students are learning how to appreciate the ralph waldo emerson friendship essay analysis world, how to use organic materials to create art and it is a sustainable class.

Prerequisite: Art I. They develop more in-depth drawing, painting, printmaking and design skills in the two-dimensional area. Mold making, junior and wood carving, steel fabricating and clay throwing skills are introduced while students devote extended periods of time to three-dimensional areas of their choice. Offered both semesters. Students use Adobe Lightroom for post-processing and will create both print and digital portfolios.

Originality, concept development, design qualities and craftsmanship are emphasized. Prerequisite: Art I, and permission of the instructor. Student will experience direct hands-on learning, while working together to give peer feedback throughout the creative process. Along the way students will be exposed to the history of the processes being used in the class. This class is perfect for people who are interested in the three-dimensional possibilities that clay writings, and will leave the class with a new found knowledge and appreciation for the medium.

We will explore more complex forms and surfaces expanding on what we have learned in Handbuilding l. Students will engage in group discussions about the transmission in compare essay ideas behind their work, and explore how to create objects that express those ideas.

Prerequisite: Ceramics Handbuilding I. We will focus on the techniques used in the process for creating functional vessels. Students will work closely with each other wra share feedback about the various objects that are created. Students will explore different types of surfaces and glaze applications used on functional wares. Student will leave this class with a lifelong skill, as well as objects they have created good topics for synthesis essay will be able to use.

Students will explore more complex and detailed forms, as well as more advanced types of vessels. Using what you have learned in Wheel Throwing l and building upon it we will open up new avenues for creating functional wares and expand upon those techniques.

Prerequisite: Ceramics Wheel Throwing I. Dance is a performance art that incorporates mind and body. It takes discipline, dedication and junior work. The main focus of the course will be technique, which gives students a strong foundation for dance. Students will be given the opportunity to work on their technique in the areas of ballet, modern, jazz and hip hop.

There will also be opportunities to experience other forms of dance such as tap and contemporary. While studying technique, the learning, understanding and practice of dance vocabulary is stressed.

Students are required to participate in two performances, which are in the end of the essay and second semester. Honors Dance: Students must audition prior to enrolling in this course, which is a full-year course. Honors Dance is for students with substantial dance experience, which includes strong technical ability and training in the areas of ballet, modern and jazz.

Dance is a performing art that incorporates both mind and body. It takes discipline, dedication, and hard work. There will also be opportunities to experience other forms of dance such as pointe, tap and contemporary.

Students are required to participate in the two performances, which are in the end of the first and second semester. Courses are offered in choir, string orchestra, symphonic winds and music theory.

Students may elect to take our performance courses — choir, string orchestra and symphonic winds — repeatedly for credit and are strongly encouraged to do so. While emphasis is placed on developing vocal skills and independent music reading, the primary focus of this group is performance. The choir performs music of many style periods and genres and is particularly proud of its history of multicultural works.

Performance opportunities include a mid-winter Madrigal Feaste, Vespers, a major work with chamber orchestra, singing at numerous WRA events and occasional off-campus opportunities. String Orchestra: The Academy String Orchestra brings together students who play violin, viola, cello and bass.

The ensemble primarily plays classical repertoire for string orchestra, occasionally combining with members of Symphonic Winds to play music written for full orchestra. String players will also have the opportunity to play chamber music and partner with The Academy Choir. This writing plays standard concert band repertoire as well as occasionally working in jazz or contemporary music. Band members will also have the opportunity to participate in small ensembles and pep band.

WRA has a small cadre of instruments for students who may not have their own. CL Music Theory: This course is intended to help students master the tools necessary for understanding the building blocks of music; essay about myself sample for it interview will gain fundamental understanding in musical notation, rhythm and meter, scales and chords.

Some prior music experience playing an instrument or singing is helpful; students will gain expertise in active listening and do some composing as well as focusing on building aural skills. During the second half of the year, the focus will be on extensive work in harmonic analysis and writing music using the rules of the Common Practice Period. Students must be able to practice independently and will be expected to demonstrate exemplary progress towards their targeted goals through performance.

THEATER Acting for the Stage: This course uses both improvisational work and scene study to teach the student-actors how to effectively prepare for and perform a theatrical role.

The course is also grounded in textual analysis and the development of certain physical techniques to create a character. Students will explore the similarities and differences of mounting and enhancing performances of theatre, dance and music, and then experience these distinctions first hand as they help prepare for events in the Knight Fine Arts Center. It is an immersive hands-on class designed around rapid prototyping and fabrication machinery. The course focuses on, but is not limited to computer aided design, computer controlled cutting, 3D printing, molding and casting, electronics production and design, CNC milling, water jet cutting, robotics, microcontrollers and welding.

Each student will complete a series of projects illustrating their competence in each process. Students will engage in a peer based interactive design curriculum that will focus on the skills essential to graphic design. The course will split time working on projects in Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign and then applying those designs to what are supporting statements in an essay machines in the Wang Innovation Center.

Photoshop is the industry leader in digital photo manipulation.

Junior and Senior Essays | Poorvu Center for Teaching and Learning

Illustrator is the industry leader in vector based graphic illustration. InDesign is desktop publishing software used to create professional posters, brochures, magazines, newspapers and books. Students will be prepared to essay the Adobe certification exam at the completion of the course. The course provides an in-depth understanding of the tech10 nical and advanced design principles that make up additive manufacturing while exploring the fundamental materials, technologies and applications of 3D printing and scanning.

The course will also spend wra learning design principles and considerations for 3D printing. The class will allow students to print on fused deposition, stereolithography and junior laser sintering printers. They will also assemble their own 3D printer. Students junior be prepared how many paragraphs do essays contain take the industry additive manufacturing certification exam.

Using the resources in the Wang Innovation Center, students also will explore embedded electronics with textiles and fabrics to create interactive wearables and e-textiles.

The course essay spend time learning about fashion and fabrications role. Students will learn the fundamentals of a writing machine, fabric types, seams, stitches, looms, electronics, writings and programming as they complete projects demonstrating their understanding of each. Offered in the school year. The course will introduce wra to the basics of artificial intelligence.

Students will cover machine learning, neural networks, visual recognition, speech recognition and processing and object manipulation.