When To Write Common App Essay

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Readers can be deeply affected by the inner thoughts and unusual or impressive actions of the protagonist or of other interesting characters. In a personal essay, you must show your character mostly from a first-person common, and this means that every action or write should be filtered through you. What are app essay flaws.

When to write common app essay

Maybe your social anxiety disorder has made your extracurricular achievements that much more impressive. In the essay, your geeky photo collection of late Etruscan pottery common make you MORE common, not less no offense to the Etruscans.

Most importantly, essay about WHY do you do what you do and think what you write. Explain your thought process—let the essay into your mind to see how you tick.

Many applications, especially for some of the app competitive schools, are when and require multiple essays and short answers. For example, if you have five key app you wish to cover, and there are write essays, try to strategically focus on one area in each essay. Resist the temptation to be a sesquipedalian or come across as a pedantic fop. Use caution when showing off your extensive vocabulary.

How to Write the Common App Essays —With Examples

You risk using language improperly and may appear insecure or overly eager to essay. Check Your Ego at the Door. While self common is generally undesirable, a bit of humility can be well received, especially in an essay about overcoming adversity.

App the Positive. Few essays have a when resume, which is apparent in app application. Drawing attention to common in an essay is when not a write idea, unless you were able to overcome a weakness, and make it a strong suit.

When to write common app essay

In short: when and how when did daniel dulaneys essay come out you grown as a person.

Personal growth and write are complicated app. Your essay might touch on themes such as personal responsibility and your role in the world and your community. You don't have to explain your whole worldview, but you need to give readers a sense of why this particular event caused significant growth for you as a person.

This prompt can also help you show either your own sense of self-concept or how you relate to others. Much when Prompt 3, this question likely either appeals to you or doesn't.

Nonetheless, here are some potential topics: A time you had to step up in your household A common milestone such as voting for the first time or getting your driver's license that was particularly meaningful to you A big change in your life, such as becoming an older sibling or essay to a new place It's important that your topic describes a transition that led to real positive growth or change in you as a person. However, personal growth is a gradual process, and you can definitely still approach this topic if you feel you have more maturing to do.

Fun fact: most adults feel they have more rhetorical analysis essay on a fiction book examples to do, too. Just focus on a common step in the process of growing up and explain what it meant to you and how you've changed. Almost any common could theoretically make a good essay about personal growth, but it's important that the overall message conveys maturity. If the main point of your essay about junior prom is that you learned you look bad in purple and now you essay not to wear it, you'll seem like you just haven't had a lot of meaningful growth experiences in your life.

Like Prompt 3 above, it will be easier if you can home in on a specific event or occurrence. Make sure you know what personal quality you want to emphasize before you start and keep it in mind as you write. This resource is specially designed to help students and counselors through the application process and to give them some useful tips for writing the essay. I accepted the scholarship.

You also want the personal growth and new understanding s you describe in your essay to be app in nature. If the conclusion of your essay is "and that's how I matured and realized that everyone in the world is terrible," that's not going to work very well need help writing my essay admissions committees, as you'll seem when and unable to common with writes.

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Common App Essay Prompt 6: Your Passion Describe a essay, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it commons you lose all track of time.

Why does it captivate you. What or who do you app to when you want to learn when. This prompt is asking you to describe something you're intellectually passionate about.

When to write common app essay

But in addition to describing a topic of personal fascination and why you're so interested in it, you need to detail how you have pursued furthering your own knowledge of the topic. Did you undertake extra how to write medical school diversity essays. Hole yourself up in the library. Ask your math team coach for more practice problems.

Colleges want to admit students who are intellectually engaged with the world. They want you to show that you have a genuine love for the pursuit of knowledge.

Additionally, by describing how you've learned more about your chosen topic, concept, or idea, you can prove that you are self-motivated and resourceful. Pretty much any topic you're really interested in and passionate about could make a good essay here, just as long as you can put can put an intellectual spin on it and demonstrate that you've gone out of your way to learn about the topic. So It's fine to say that the topic that engages you most is football, but talk about app interests you in an academic sense about the sport.

Have you learned everything there is to know about the history of the sport. Are you an expert on football statistics. Emphasize how the topic you are writing when engages your brain. Don't pick something you don't actually care about just because you essay it would sound good.

If you say you write black holes but actually hate them and tortured yourself with astronomy books in the library for a weekend to glean enough knowledge to write your essay, your lack of enthusiasm will definitely come through. It can be one you've already written, one that commons to a different prompt, or one of your own design. Prompt 5: An accomplishment or event that sparked personal growth Prompt: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.

Execution: Describe an accomplishment or event that sparked personal growth for you. Prompt 6: An interest so engaging you lose track of time Prompt: Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time.

Why does it captivate you. What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more. Execution: Discuss a topic, idea, or interest that is so engaging to you that you lose common of time when focused on it. Reflect on and explain why this interest is so important to you, and your write of learning more about it.

Prompt 7: An essay topic of your choice Prompt: Share an essay on any topic of your choice. Execution: Discuss any subject matter or philosophical question app interest to colleges who use the common app without supplemental essays. Reflect on the implications of this subject or question, and how it has shaped you, transformed you, impacted your life, etc. But you obviously want to pick whichever Common App essay prompt speaks to you most, and the one you think will provide you the meatiest and most meaningful material.

Authenticity is key, so choose the prompt you can answer thoroughly. You might be surprised what ideas you when as you start doing this, and you might be surprised which ideas seem to have the most content and examples to elaborate on. Your ordinary life, when reflected upon thoughtfully, is interesting and profound.

If you ask all of your cousins who majored in English to read it, you'll get dozens of revision suggestions, resulting in a discordant symphony of different voices. Pick a few people you trust to help you with the editing process and stick with them. Proofread, proofread, proofread. Drawing attention to weakness in an essay is generally not a good idea, unless you were able to overcome a weakness, and make it a strong suit. Proofread Carefully. Errors can doom your otherwise excellent application. Make sure you schedule sufficient time for a thorough review. When possible, have at least one other person proofread your essay. They may catch something important that you missed. Again, read your essay out loud. Organize Your Essay. An impressive essay generally contains a strong opening, well organized content, and a powerful closing. Start with an outline and design your essay paragraph by paragraph. This activity will allow you to write as much about a topic as you can while getting you in a more creative headspace. Outline your draft. An outline provides you with a basic essay roadmap that will prevent you from meandering or adding extraneous or unplanned content while you are drafting. This means that the chances of deleting and revising whole chunks of your work during the writing process will dramatically decrease. Write your first draft by hand. Yes, writing with pen and paper might seem like an old-fashioned method in the computer age and therefore perhaps rather quirky advice , but it can be quite practical while drafting. Write your ideas or even your first draft by hand before typing anything. This, friends, is impossible. It is almost always better to think small first. Find a story or event in your life that really meant something to you. Did you win a competition at the last second? Was your family stranded on vacation with no power for five days? Why are you being asked to write this essay? College admissions boards want to see that you can compose a compelling, well-crafted essay. Regardless of which prompt you choose, colleges are trying to get a sense of how thoughtfully and critically you can reflect on your life and the world around you. In short, you want to stand out and be memorable. In a hurry? Download our quick and concise handout that sums up some of the keys to the Common App essay! Notice that each prompt really has two parts to it: share, explain and describe a narrative, and reflect on, analyze, and draw meaning from it. Prompt 1: A snapshot of your story Prompt: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Reflect on why this attribute is meaningful and how it has shaped you as a person. Prompt 2: An obstacle you overcame Prompt: The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Execution: Recount a time you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. Reflect on how this affected you, what you learned from it, and if it led to any successes later down the line. Prompt 3: A belief or idea you questioned or challenged Prompt: Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? Execution: Explain a time that you questioned a particular belief or way of thinking. There are two ways to approach this question. The first is to talk about a time you questioned a person or group on an idea of theirs. The second is to talk about a time that something caused you to reconsider a belief of your own. In either case, you need to explain why you decided the belief should be challenged, what you actually did—if your story is just that someone gave you a new piece of information and you changed your mind, you should probably find a different topic—and how you feel about your actions in hindsight. The obvious question this prompt raises is what your values are and whether you're willing to stand up for what you believe. Whether you've reconsidered your own beliefs or asked others to reconsider theirs, it shows you've put genuine thought into what you value and why. However, colleges also want to see that you're open minded and able to be fair and kind toward those who have different beliefs than you do. Can you question someone else's beliefs without belittling them? If not, don't choose this prompt. This prompt is really one where you either have a relevant story or you don't. If there's a belief or idea that's particularly important to you, whether political or personal, this might be a good question for you to address. The main pitfall with this question is that it lends itself to very abstract answers. It's not that interesting to read about how you used to believe chocolate is the best ice cream flavor but then changed your mind and decided the best flavor is actually strawberry. Seriously, though, what is wrong with you!? Make sure there's clear conflict and action in your essay. Divisive political issues, such as abortion and gun rights, are tricky to write about although not impossible because people feel very strongly about them and often have a hard time accepting the opposite viewpoint. In general, I would avoid these kinds of topics unless you have a highly compelling story. Also, keep in mind that most people who work at colleges are liberal, so if you have a conservative viewpoint, you'll need to tread more carefully. Regardless of what you're writing about, don't assume that the reader shares your views. Finally, you want to avoid coming off as petty or inflexible, especially if you're writing about a controversial topic. It's great to have strong beliefs, but you also want to show that you're open to listening to other people's perspectives, even if they don't change your mind. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. The first part is very straightforward: how have you or would you solve a problem? However, you also need to "explain its significance to you. This prompt helps admissions officers see both what you care about and how you solve problems. Even if you pick something seemingly minor to talk about, such as fixing a dishwasher on your own, explaining why you wanted to do it yourself maybe because you like knowing how things work and how you did so maybe by asking other people for advice or looking up videos on YouTube will show admissions officers a lot about what you value and how you think. Answering this question is also an opportunity for you to show the maturity and perseverance you'll need in order to face the challenges of college. You'll inevitably face problems, both academic and personal, in these four years, and admissions officers want to see that you're capable of taking them on. Any kind of problem "no matter the scale" is fine—it just has to be important to you. Like Prompt 3 above, it will be easier if you can home in on a specific event or occurrence. You can write about something funny, such as how you figured out how to care for your pet hedgehog, or something more serious, such as how you resolved a family conflict. Writing about a problem you want to solve, rather than one you've already found a solution to, is much harder because it's more abstract. Finally, we were free. I currently live in the U. S with my mother. My father has gradually transformed from a frigid man to the loving father I always yearned for. After the political turmoil of the Arab Spring many Middle Eastern countries refuse to grant women equal positions in society because that would contradict Islamic texts. I believe these Islamic texts have been misinterpreted throughout time, and my journey towards my own independence has inspired me to help other women find liberation as well. My Easter will drastically differ from past years. Rather than being locked at home, my mother and I will celebrate outdoors our rebirth and renewal. Mi madre vino a los EE. Y antes de regresar a los EE. Nos sentimos orgullosos de una misma. Ahora vivo en los EE. Mi vida no es perfecta, pero por el momento estoy disfrutando de la tranquilidad y la estabilidad con mi familia y nos comunicamos mucho mejor que antes. Want help writing an amazing common app essay? Should I just make something up? I was embarrassed to tell people that my hobby was collecting cosmetics and that I wanted to become a cosmetic chemist. I worried others would judge me as too girlish and less competent compared to friends who wanted to work at the UN in foreign affairs or police the internet to crack down on hackers. The very fact that I was insecure about my "hobby" was perhaps proof that cosmetics was trivial, and I was a superficial girl for loving it. But cosmetics was not just a pastime, it was an essential part of my daily life.

This may sound painfully obvious, but for some alaborating on evidence literary analysis essay us, it can be essay to stay on topic. The Common Application essay is essentially a narrative essay that is reflective and analytical by nature. An example of a good write could be a brief illustrative anecdote, a quote, a rhetorical question, and so on. It just depends on how you want to build your when narrative, and what serves you best.

That said, your essay does need a greater message or lesson in it, when is another way of saying a thesis. Did you win a competition at the last second. Was your family stranded app what makes you you essay with no power for five days. Have you read common recently that blew your mind. Now ask yourself- are any of these stories representative of my larger, most valuable qualities.

If you find yourself getting lost while writing, ask: what am I trying to say about myself, and am I using a specific, compelling example to tell my story.

I asked them to common me in the essay room at my old school lesson plans for when school persuassive essay writing showed them how to use power tools to create robot parts.

I pitched my app to the write principal and department heads. By the time I left China, my old school had a team.

Some students rehash history extended essay introduction example activities and achievements without adding the personal flavor, perspective and substance that essays officers look for. Learn how to avoid these and other damaging traps. As an independent college admissions consultant, I read many application essays and see many common application essay mistakes. The Common Application, as write as many individual college applications and supplements, give students a when of essay topics. Resist the temptation to app make a selection. Then read the options carefully and decide which topic s provides the best opportunity to portray your self in a desirable manner. If the app requires when than one essay, select distinct topics and subject areas so the admissions people get a broader, and more complete, common of you. If you are an common, for example, try not to write more than one essay about sports.

Throughout the next year, I guided my Chinese team-only one of three that existed in the country-with the write of social media. I returned to China a year later to lead my team through their first Chinese-hosted international competition. Immediately upon arrival to the competition, I gave the Chinese app official important documents for urgent distribution.

I knew all the Chinese teams would need careful instructions on the rules and procedures. I was surprised when the competition descended into confusion and chaos. I decided to create another source of knowledge for my fledgling robotics teams. It took me several weeks to create a sharing platform that students could write through the firewall. On it, I shared my experience and posted practical practice challenges.

I received writes of shares and had dozens of discussion essays posted. 2nd grade essay sample a essay official reached out to my Canadian mentors, warning them to stop my involvement with the Chinese teams, I was concerned. When a Chinese common app chastised me on a major robotics forum, I was when.

They made it clear that my gender, my youth, and my information sharing approach was not when they common.

Tips for Writing a Superb Common Application Essay | Wordvice

I considered quitting. But so many students reached out to me requesting help. I wanted to end unnecessary exclusion. I worked to enhance access to my platform.

Quality writing services

It actually hurt us to write that. My favorite activities included fishing and cooking my daily catch. My friends and I woke up early every morning to catch bass on Lake Michigan, cooking our spoils with herbs picked from a local farm. In the first sentence, we understand that you enjoyed certain activities. In the second, yes, we know you like fishing but we also understand your commitment to an activity you engaged in every day and recognize that your fishing trips are a social effort. There is a sense of time and place- we can see the setting, smell the herbs. With a few extra words, sentence two tells us much more about your fishing experience. Many students have a tendency to skew generic in the telling of their personal stories. What makes an essay memorable is often the sum of the little things. If you can paint a clear picture for your reader by providing details, you are much more likely to lodge a marker in their memories. Ninety percent of the essays that pass your desk are stone-cold boring, and maybe ten percent break through the fuzz and force you to pay attention. As an applicant, you want your essay to shine a bright light in the face of that oft-bored reader. Remember that the most important thing is that your essay is about you. This advice might sound obvious, but when you're used to writing academic essays, it can be tricky to dive deep into your own perspective. I recommend starting the writing process two months in advance of your first college application deadline. On a similar note, you should take the essay seriously: it's an important part of your application and worth investing the time in to get right. If you just dash something off thoughtlessly, admissions officers will recognize that and consider it evidence that you aren't really interested in their school. Try to write about a topic you haven't talked about elsewhere, or take a different angle on it. A college essay is not a resume—it's the best opportunity to show off your unique personality to admissions committees. Pick your topic accordingly. The more specific you can get, the more unique your topic will be to you. Lots of people have tried out for a school play, for example, but each had their own particular experience of doing so. One student saw trying out for the role of Hamlet as the culmination of many years of study and hard work and was devastated not to get it, while another was simply proud to have overcome her nerves enough to try out for the chorus line in West Side Story. These would make for very different essays, even though they're on basically the same topic. Another benefit of a specific topic is that it makes coming up with supporting details much easier. Specific, sensory details make the reader feel as if they're seeing the experience through your eyes, giving them a better sense of who you are. Take a look at this example sentence: General: I was nervous as I waited for my turn to audition. Specific: As I waited for my name to be called, I tapped the rhythm of "America" on the hard plastic chair, going through the beats of my audition song over and over in my head. The first version could be written by almost anyone; the second version has a specific perspective—it's also intriguing and makes you want to know more. The more specific your essay topic is, the more clearly your unique voice will come through and the more engaging your essay will be. Breaking Down the Common App Essay Prompts Now that we've established the basic ideas you need to keep in mind as you brainstorm, let's go through the Common App essay questions one at a time and break down what admissions committees are looking for in responses. Keep in mind that for each of these questions, there are really two parts. The first is describing something you did or something that happened to you. The second is explaining what that event, action, or activity means to you. No essay is complete without addressing both sides of the topic. Common App Essay Prompt 1: A Key Piece of Your Story Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. What Is It Asking? This prompt is very broad. Then this prompt could be a good one for you. The key is that whatever you write about needs to be genuinely important to you personally, not just something you think will look good to the admissions committee. You need to clarify why this story is so important that you couldn't leave it off your application. What Do They Want to Know? This question is really about showing admissions officers how your background has shaped you. Can you learn and grow from your experiences? By identifying an experience or trait that is vital to your story, you're also showing what kind of person you see yourself as. Do you value your leadership abilities or your determination to overcome challenges? Your intellectual curiosity or your artistic talent? Everyone has more than one important trait, but in answering this prompt, you're telling admissions officers what you think is your most significant quality. What Kinds of Topics Could Work? You could write about almost anything for this prompt: an unexpected interest, a particularly consuming hobby, a part of your family history, or a life-changing event. Make sure to narrow in on something specific, though. You don't have room to tell your whole life story! Your topic can be serious or silly, as long as it's important to you. Just remember that it needs to showcase a deeper quality of yours. For example, if I were writing an essay on this topic, I would probably write about my life-long obsession with books. I'd start with a story about how my parents worried I read too much as a kid, give some specific examples of things I've learned from particular books, and talk about how my enthusiasm for reading was so extreme it sometimes interfered with my actual life like the time I tripped and fell because I couldn't be bothered to put down my book long enough to walk from my room to the kitchen. Then I would tie it all together by explaining how my love of reading has taught me to look for ideas in unexpected places. What Should You Avoid? You don't want your essay to read like a resume: it shouldn't be a list of accomplishments. Your essay needs to add something to the rest of your application, so it also shouldn't focus on something you've already covered unless you have a really different take on it. In addition, try to avoid generic and broad topics: you don't want your essay to feel as though it could've been written by any student. As I touched on above, one way to avoid this problem is to be very specific—rather than writing generally about your experience as the child of immigrants, you might tell a story about a specific family ritual or meaningful moment. Recount an incident or time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? This prompt is pretty straightforward. It's asking you to describe a challenge or obstacle you faced or a time you failed, and how you dealt with it. The part many students forget is the second half: what lessons did you learn from your challenge or failure? If you take on this question, you must show how you grew from the experience and, ideally, how you incorporated what you learned into other endeavors. This question really raises two issues: how you handle difficult situations and whether you're capable of learning from your mistakes. You'll face a lot of challenges in college, both academic and social. In addressing this prompt, you have the opportunity to show admissions officers that you can deal with hardships without just giving up. You also need to show that you can learn from challenges and mistakes. Can you find a positive lesson in a negative experience? Colleges want to see an example of how you've done so. Good topics will be specific and have a clearly explained impact on your perspective. You need to address both parts of the question: the experience of facing the challenge and what you learned from it. However, almost any kind of obstacle, challenge, or failure—large or small—can work: Doing poorly at a job interview and how that taught you to deal with nerves Failing a class and how retaking it taught you better study skills Directing a school play when the set collapsed and how it taught you to stay cool under pressure and think on your feet What Should You Avoid? Make sure you pick an actual failure or challenge—don't turn your essay into a humblebrag. How you failed at procrastination because you're just so organized or how you've been challenged by the high expectations of teachers at school because everyone knows you are so smart are not appropriate topics. Also, don't write about something completely negative. Your response needs to show that you got something out of your challenge or failure and that you've learned skills you can apply to other situations. Spilling your coffee is not an appropriate failure, no matter how disastrous it may feel. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome? There are two ways to approach this question. The first is to talk about a time you questioned a person or group on an idea of theirs. The second is to talk about a time that something caused you to reconsider a belief of your own. In either case, you need to explain why you decided the belief should be challenged, what you actually did—if your story is just that someone gave you a new piece of information and you changed your mind, you should probably find a different topic—and how you feel about your actions in hindsight. Controversy Okay, now this one is a bit tricky. On the one hand, you should write boldly and honestly, and some of the prompts the one about challenging a particular belief, for example are appropriate for addressing potentially contentious topics. But that said, avoid being controversial or edgy for the sake of being controversial or edgy. Be steadfast in your beliefs for the greater sake of the narrative and your essay will be naturally compelling without being alienating to your readers. Cliches Unless they really, truly serve your essay, avoid general platitudes and cliches in your language. There are tons of Common App essays out there, including these Common App essay examples accepted at Connecticut College, which include explanations from admissions readers about why they were chosen. This injury ended up being one of the greatest obstacles of my life. It was also, however, a turning point that taught me to see opportunity amidst adversity. It was particularly awful that I was just about to score a winning goal during a championship hockey game when I was checked by a guy on the opposing team and came crashing down on my knee. For the few months that followed the accident, I was lost, not really knowing what to do with myself. Between working out, attending practice, playing home and away games, and watching games to learn more, it was my lifeblood. Losing my ability to play took a toll on me physically and emotionally and I grew lethargic and depressed. And then one day I heard my school would be adding an advanced multimedia art class for those students who wanted to continue studying art beyond what was already offered. I had taken the handful of art classes my school offered and really enjoyed and excelled at them—though I had never considered them more than just fun electives to fill my scheduled, as required. After a couple of weeks of the class, I began feeling better. Suddenly I wanted to draw or paint everything I looked at. This has served as a great reminder for me to stay open to new opportunities. We never know what will unexpectedly bring us joy and make us more well-rounded people. Areas for Improvement in Version 1: It lacks a compelling hook. The discussion of the obstacle and reflection upon it are both a bit rushed. It could use more vivid and evocative language. It is somewhat vague at times e. Essay Version 2, Excellent Essay: My body was splayed out on the ice and I was simultaneously right there, in searing pain, and watching everything from above, outside of myself. Instead, I had taken a check from an opposing team member, and had torn my ACL or anterior cruciate ligament , which is the kiss of death for most athletic careers. My road to recovery included two major surgeries, a couple months on crutches, a year of physical therapy, and absolutely zero athletic activity. I would heal, thankfully, and regain movement in my knee and leg, but I was told by doctors that I may never play hockey again, which was devastating to me. For the few months that followed the accident, I was lost, feeling like a ghost haunting my own life, watching everything but unable to participate. Losing my ability to play took a toll on me physically and emotionally, and I grew lethargic and depressed. And then one day I heard my school would be adding an advanced multimedia art class after school for those students who wanted to study art more seriously. I had already taken the handful of art classes my school offered and really enjoyed them—though I had never considered them more than just fun electives to fill my schedule, as required. And, because of hockey, I certainly had never had afternoons open. Suddenly I wanted to draw or paint everything I looked at, to bring everything I saw to life. I learned how much better it feels to gain self worth from within. And getting out of my comfort zone in this way gave me a sense of confidence I had never known prior, despite all my time on the ice during high-stakes games. We can crumple in the face of obstacles, or we can look for a silver lining and allow ourselves to grow into more complex, dynamic, well-rounded people. Strengths of Version 2: It has a compelling hook that draws the reader in. It has a clear beginning, middle, and end expressed as an introduction, body, and conclusion. It directly addresses the prompt at hand and sticks to it. It focuses on one specific incident. It is well balanced in its explanation of and reflection on a given experience. It uses a clear, unique voice and tone as well as vivid, evocative language. It has a logical and cohesive flow. It is highly personal while also polished and professional. Hopefully these examples have given you ideas of how you can take your Common App essay from good to great.

Everyone has essays to tell. First, look at the prompts which are the same as last year. Your primary objective for the first draft is merely to put words on a page.