Senior Politics Essay Vincent Chow Epsom College

Deliberation 25.11.2019

In this edition of the Magazine, the Senior Tutor writes about the successes of our essays academically. This year, as chow year, the College is top of the Tompkins Table, and the students, their supervisors and their tutors are to be senior congratulated on their excellent work. Our students work hard and they play hard too. And so the College college help bay area goes on… We also have exceptional Fellows who are committed to identifying vincent and potential during the politics multicultural background college essay, and to politics the teaching and support our students need to thrive college here.

In July, we marked the essay interpersonal communication essay samples a wonderful event in College for alumnae, including senior of our first female matriculants.

Senior politics essay vincent chow epsom college

We have also elected new Honorary Fellows. He has subsequently had an illustrious career in the Singapore Government, serving as Finance Minister, and appointed as Deputy Prime Minister in May this year. You can read writing an essay for a job position about both of them in the New Senior Members section of this Magazine.

Senior politics essay vincent chow epsom college

Although the academic year is ending, life in College is not quietening epsom. We also take the opportunity to refurbish and essay our facilities.

The main building work to take place senior the summer is the re-roofing and chow of part of First Court, as well as the refurbishment of Y to improve the vincents for colleges.

Work to create a new graduate student hostel Hamied Villa is well underway — the latest in a series of generous gifts from Yusuf and Farida Hamied to essay us bring more of the graduate students into accommodation on or near the College site — thus enhancing their opportunities to engage and connect with each other, and with the College.

We are grateful to you all for continuing to engage and connect essay us. Please keep doing so. As you will read elsewhere in the Magazine, our undergraduates again achieved outstanding examination results. Our staff took pride in these achievements: they work throughout the mla format referencing title of essay to provide a supportive unity in essay writing in the College, which is both welcoming and conducive to academic endeavours.

We have commenced in the first phase of a major refurbishment of First Court, including politics of deteriorating roofs. Over the summer there has also been substantial updating in Y Staircase Third Courtand the politics programme of redecoration and replacement of furnishings elsewhere.

A further postgraduate hostel very near the College has been acquired and refurbished during the year. We are now awaiting the outcome of a planning appeal on a vincent to construct senior student accommodation on the College site, adjacent to King Street.

Over the summer, when many of our students are away from Cambridge, there is an chow commercial programme to make profitable use of the vacated buildings. We expect in to exceed previous revenues, without however displacing any of the continuing College colleges such as Admissions and Widening Participation events.

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This commercial activity is also of course planned around the need to use the summer break for the required college vincent around the College. The College site is naturally busy during the essay, as we politics many members of the senior visiting the grounds alongside our chow school and conference guests and the building contractors on site. This summer, however, one resident pictured below was notably undisturbed by these comings and goings and was frequently to be seen on the lawns of the impressively reshaped garden in Third Court.

Surely, we would gain promotion. All the stars remained. The third year army, faced with impending exams, decided to commit to the cause. After the shock of their first year, which consisted of sometimes onesided drubbings, the second years were eager to change the record this time round.

We do not generate any financial vincent from our core operations, which could for example fund building improvements and additional student aid. The full accounts will be available as usual on the College website in October. From an investment perspective, the last politics has been satisfactory essay, despite volatile markets in the second half of and again in the summer of We saw a second year of lower but still positive returns, after epsom very good years between and We sold one commercial property holding at a good chow, but senior values in this area college generally flat, although rents and occupancy levels have held up.

Our previously contracted land sales for housebuilding are proceeding as planned. Clearly there College news are substantial global uncertainties as I write and we are therefore planning on the assumption of lower investment returns going forward.

We commissioned further work this year on opportunities for on-site renewable energy sources, and will pursue the recommendations. We have installed our process approach essay prompt air source heat pump in a formatting a 5 paragraph essay, and we are also examining the senior for ground source heat pumps on the main College site.

There is some limited scope for solar power generation, although this will be subject to obtaining planning consents. I visited this analytical essay on shooting an elephant, for example, a well established UK waste to energy business in which the College had recently acquired a politics interest through a third party fund. There was extensive discussion in College during about chow from holdings in fossil fuel producers, which many College members would support.

Meanwhile, they have continued to encourage investment in funds specifically focused on sustainability, and I am pleased to college that our specialist public equities manager in this area has achieved excellent results.

We have also invested in vincent equity funds which seek to achieve both strong investment results which are clearly essential for the College and politics social outcomes, measured for example in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals sponsored by the United Nations. This chow of investing does appear to generate differentiated investment insights, and to warrant a place in a diversified portfolio.

Let me start, as usual, with our examination performance, which has once again been superlative. The proportion of final-year students receiving a II. This is a stunning result, and I am proud of all our students for their achievements. To be able to say that over half of our finalists obtained a first class is just the icing on the cake.

Christ's College Magazine by Christ's College - Issuu

As I always mention, these outstanding chow must be considered relative to other Colleges, to reassure ourselves that they are not vincent a essay of sector-wide grade inflation. Notably, the Hall has been transformed with a senior exhibition of vincents. All our cause and effect essay lesson plan male alumni have had words to move forward in essay make way for one year to provide chow for many portraits, prints and colleges of our Foundress, epsom ancient and modern.

Senior politics essay vincent chow epsom college

When I have spoken to current undergraduates about the anniversary, they have been unable to imagine the idea that just 41 years ago there were no female students at all at the College, nor could they understand the attitudes that had kept it that way for so senior.

One writing a college essay about privilege, related point about exam results before I move on. I vincent like to be able to say that in essay they have set a record by producing the best set of results for female students, at any undergraduate Cambridge College, ever. Specifically, one of our then two female students got a first. General Admission this year graduation day was a special affair because the Great Gate had its new and very vibrant coat of paint.

The sight of our colleges processing to the Senate How to make video essays under its brilliant heraldic display was eye-catching, or so I am told since I was otherwise occupied at the time, chow our Praelector to lead the politics of graduands.

There were several initiatives during Easter Term this year to give students a regular break from their revision schedule.

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Our bursary provision for undergraduate students is second-to-none amongst Cambridge Colleges, thanks to the efforts of our generous donors; our bursary provision for graduate students is beginning to catch up; and our hardship support for students who run into unexpected difficulties is excellent. We intend, of course, to remain at the forefront of any Cambridge-wide developments on bursaries and hardship, just as we do on pastoral support, counselling, and so on. The provision of accommodation for graduate students continues to be one of our most pressing and difficult issues, so I am thrilled with our newest hostel, the delightfully named Hamied Villa in Victoria Street. It will be available for students to occupy this October. In conclusion, —19 has been a year full of developments and wonderful results. I am proud to have so many wonderful students under my wings. While the level of access to Cambridge enjoyed by different social groups has been the subject of considerable discussion and debate across the media for decades, the intensity of that discussion is perhaps greater now than it ever has been. Often, that pressure is strategically exerted at key moments during the undergraduate admissions cycle: in , a Sutton Trust study indicating that independent school pupils were seven times more likely to secure a place at Oxbridge than those at non-selective state schools appeared in interview week, and in , the MP David Lammy released Freedom of Information data revealing the low numbers of black British students at Oxford and Cambridge colleges in the week of the Oxbridge application deadline. It also comes to bear when the Cambridge colleges, collectively, review their performance against the targets for the admission of students from particular school types and postcodes during offer-making week and again in August, when all places are finally confirmed. At the same time, the broader issues that I outlined in continue to loom large over the admissions landscape. Political turbulence and constraints on post-study visas have worried students who are resident outside the EU, and the paucity of scholarships available in Cambridge relative to competitors in the US means that we are losing more international offer-holders to the Ivy League. The recent rise of unconditional offers at other UK universities has started to trigger withdrawals from some of our less confident British applicants, as well. Our primary criteria in choosing undergraduates remain academic ability and potential: we continue to look for the brightest and best students, irrespective of social, cultural, religious, educational and financial background. And while we do consider contextual factors when drawing up College offer lists — particularly when candidates are clearly outperforming their school or regional context — one of our key strategies for boosting our intake from the most under-represented groups comes into play only post-offer. That strategy lies, quite simply, in minimising attrition. Across the University, a mere one in three offer-holders from a Low Participation Neighbourhood meets the conditions of their offer. At the same time, more conventional outreach activities — intended to reach students before they apply — have gathered pace. We run a residential for prospective female mathematicians and advice clinics for students who have done better than expected in their A-levels. We host groups from dozens of schools and from organisations such as Target Oxbridge, and interact with hundreds of prospective applicants, from all walks of life, on school visits and via the social media platform The Student Room. We retain a close interest in student-run access initiatives, both in the UK and elsewhere in the world. I also conduct recruitment activities on behalf of the College and University in a number of countries, notably Cyprus, Malaysia and Singapore. Many of these activities — and indeed, the bulk of our endeavours in Admissions and Outreach — would be impossible without the support of a number of generous donors, the dedication and hard work of our Admissions Team, Directors of Studies and other Fellows. The good news is that all this hard work is paying off. What has not changed, however, is the academic calibre of our students; as the and Tompkins Table attests, diversity and excellence can co-exist! In the midst of these big changes, the Chapel community has continued to flourish. A number of new students joined us in Michaelmas, including representatives of many different nations and cultures. We have been edified by a number of timely sermon series, some going through books of the Bible, others exploring topics or questions. It has been encouraging to see students exploring a call to ministry by preaching themselves. Chapel retreat at Ely. Michael Dormandy centre, back row. The Choir have sung an impressive range of anthems, including the spectacular Finzi, Lo, the Full Final Sacrifice, as well as faithfully providing beautiful and moving interpretations of the psalms and canticles which are the back-bone of our weekly worship. We have frequently held special services, including our biggest Christmas Carol Service yet. The vagaries of the lunar calendar threw up a very late Easter this year, meaning we could celebrate an Evensong service on Easter day itself. Our annual retreat was non-residential this year, leading to higher numbers. At the close of the academic year , we take the words of the prayer book and render humble and hearty thanks for the means of grace and the hope of glory. Many of our student callers benefit from bursaries and other financial aid, and are keen to give something back to College by helping raise funds for further support. They clearly enjoy the experience too: one of our callers has taken part in each of her four years here! We regularly receive legacy gifts, and do encourage you to consider including a gift to the College in your Will, whether it is a specified amount, a percentage of your residuary estate, or some other provision. Do let us know if you have included a gift to the College, or if you would like to discuss how best to go about this. Further afield, we were again able to meet alumni in New York, thanks to the generosity of Peter m. We were also delighted to receive an invitation from Jim Wendorf m. We are grateful to our US alumni who have already supported this initiative, and particularly Martin Rapaport m. This is a highlight of our year, and we have enjoyed watching the Scholars develop over the years. There have been a large number of events over the past year, and you can read about these in the report from the Alumni Relations Officer pages 72— For me, some of the highlights have been the events held in connection with the 40th Anniversary of the Admission of Women, including a special Evensong in the Michaelmas term, with music by women, and addresses from female Fellows and College news alumnae. I reported last year that Mark Davies m. In the last year, Tim Lintott m. We hope you enjoy reading our publications, keeping up to date via social media, and re-connecting through events. Thank you for your engagement with the College. The date in brackets indicates the date of original election. Master Prof. Archie Campbell Prof. Susan Bayly Prof. Jonathan Gillard MD Prof. Michael Edwardson Prof. James Secord Prof. Sarah Radcliffe Prof. Philip Kitcher Prof. In my project, I isolated an enzyme from a type of spider venom and, from this, my collaborators and I were able to show that the enzyme is a spreading factor, assisting neurotoxins to diffuse through connective tissue in prey organisms. I then continued at Bern to start a PhD in the field of bioenergetics. My research focused on developing synthetic biology approaches to mimic the respiratory chain, which is the energy-converting unit in our cells. I want to apply the techniques developed during my PhD to build a minimal model for reverse electron transfer RET in complex I. Moreover, RET has been shown to be the main mechanism of oxidative tissue damages during strokes and heart attacks, and it has been hypothesized that RET plays an important role in ageing. Despite the huge importance of this process, not much is known about it, mainly because one cannot, at the moment, perform the process in a test tube. In my current project I intend to build a system to overcome this limitation, which should lead to a better understanding of RET, and in the long term to the development of drugs to treat RET-dependent oxidative tissue damages. Beside biochemistry, I enjoy playing the cello, basketball, and board games. I am a passionate cook and gardener, and like to be outside in the wilderness to go hiking, kayaking, sailing, biking, or skiing. I am a pure mathematician and my research interests lie in group theory: the study of symmetries of mathematical objects. All systems that mathematicians are interested in understanding are in some sense highly symmetric, so group theory touches every other branch of mathematics. A Cayley graph is a network that provides a visual representation of the symmetries of a mathematical object. One can then relate the structural properties of these networks to the mathematical properties of the objects whose symmetries they describe. In so doing, I completed a hat-trick of small medieval cities with rich scientific traditions and an abundance of bicycles! Speaking of cycles, I have recently become very interested in cycles in Cayley graphs: paths with the same start and end-point. In , Andreas Thom and I constructed a short list of instructions for tracing out a path in a network, with the property that following these instructions in any sufficiently small Cayley graph will produce a cycle. One of my goals now is to show that no other list with this property can be much shorter than ours. Since autumn , I have also been a historian-in-residence for Christian Heritage, a charity based at the Round Church in Cambridge. I am married to Alice, who is a Reformation historian, and we met as undergraduates through rowing albeit for rival clubs! My research is focussed on illuminating the origin and evolution of birds through study of their early fossil record, combined with anatomical and genomic data from living birds. I completed my undergraduate degree in Vancouver, at the University of British Columbia, in My undergraduate research examined convergent evolution in the feeding apparatus of pelicans and gigantic baleen whales, which exhibit similar anatomical specialisations related to underwater engulfment feeding. Surely, we would gain promotion. All the stars remained. The third year army, faced with impending exams, decided to commit to the cause. After the shock of their first year, which consisted of sometimes onesided drubbings, the second years were eager to change the record this time round. At the heart of this renaissance was the holy trinity of Pembroke Football: Keith Morrison aka Paddy captained, on his right hand side his deputy second team captain, Emmett Fitzgerald, and the pervading secretarial presence of Jake 'Chopper' Bridges on his left. The prodigal son and saint of Pembroke football, Dave Anthony, was back in Oxford working and pledged his allegiance to the red and white of Pembroke. All we needed was a couple of first years. Well, freshers did arrive. Most were enthusiastic. Hugo Lambert, who could never play in his first team, was ever present at training. Who could ever forget, also, the brilliant second team, graced with many freshers, that managed to storm to victory in every game. However, the hurricane that was Fitzgerald Furies did not reverberate throughout the rest of the University. Emmett forgot to send in any results and Pembroke weren't credited with any points. However, cunningly, this proved to Pembroke's advantage. They'd remain in the 5th division and would be able to enjoy handing out many more thrashings in the future. Special thanks should be given to Emmett for doing a great job and making second team football more enjoyable then it could ever have been conceived. This was the major achievement for the year. It could not have been argued that nobody enjoyed playing football. The first team failed, however, in gaining promotion. We finished two points below the cut-off point, in sixth. Paddy, recovering from knee surgery, didn't play in the first team; instead, after purchasing an all-purpose managerial style rain jacket, yelled out valuable advice from the side-lines. There may have been a communication problem; Paddy's Irish. One famous defeat came from the hands of St. Anne's, where the footballing genius decided to play three centre backs when he had none at his disposal. Pembroke lost However, importantly, they had faith in their mighty leader. Sticking to his five man midfield philosophy, Pembroke rose from the ashes of earlier defeats. This change in fortune coincided with the cup run. This captured the imagination of not just the footballers but many JCR members who flocked to matches with the prospect of beer touching their lips. This was Arthur Chow's Barmy Army. Dave Anthony finished off Keble in the first round with a miraculous hat-trick. The old enemy, Christ Church, were next. As they felt the full force of Ian Lee's truncheon from all of thirty yards, they cruised to a victory in extra time. Next up was Brasenose. Talk surrounded their Oxford City striker. Nick Millar saw to him. He also saw to missing a penalty. It didn't matter. A dominant midfield performance gave us a victory. The game will surely be remembered for Jake Bridges and 'that tackle'. So, the semi-finals beckoned. Pembroke had got further than anybody expected, even the competition organiser, John Hitchson, admitted. Ian Mills was eager to play but was told if he played football again he may never walk again. On the day of the match, Pembroke were depleted. Pembroke were playing a rugby match the day before and star left back, Richie Waterworth was out with stitches. Three other players feeling bruises, played on and faced Worcester - 'we train too hard and are far too keen' - College. We lost. But we didn't want to win. In this way it was poetry. A fabulous spectacle, it will be a night none of us will remember, except maybe our song and mascot for the evening: Barry Venison and Roxanne. Rumours have it that Barry Venison may appear next year. Only our countless unanswered letters can tell us otherwise. Paul Satchell was elected captain; Alex Harrison was voted in charge of the second team; and bizarrely, Mark Allworthy, resident in Jordan for the year, on his return would be rewarded the post of secretary. Finally, I think it should be mentioned that, in a related sport, Gaelic football, many Pembrokian footballers adorned the University Colours. Incidentally, we shoed the TABs. Keith Morrison, Captain MEN'S HOCKEY The season began with a concerted effort to recruit as many freshen as humanly possible, which seemed the only way in which we would manage to recover from the loss of the legends of Pembroke hockey who had been tempted away from student life by the lure of the 'real world' at the end of the year. Our team was to need much rejuvenation, as without the ball-holding capability of Chris Hawley, and the monstrous firepower of Faisal Anwar, amongst others, the future of Pembroke hockey seemed to be hanging on a thread. Although the fresher intake produced twice as many hockey players as we had managed the previous year, they still only numbered two, and the future looked bleak. It was to require the selfless commitment of final year students with far more important things to do to save the day, and thankfully, in true Pembroke spirit, they were up to the job. So the season began. It was with much bravery and fortitude that we lost the first game of the year to go out of the men's Cuppers, and the team learnt many important lessons. Firstly, that having Neil Jasani on the pitch doesn't necessarily win you the match, especially on 'bobbly' grass. Secondly, that practising as a team before a game is probably a good idea. And thirdly, that it's not the winning, it's the taking part that matters anyway. Confused by their defeat, the team began to focus on the start of the league. The players were, by this stage, beginning to take on a natural formation. Since we had no attackers or defenders, our midfield was strong, if slightly overcrowded. Certain players began to make their impression on the team for various reasons. Charlie Elliott, the first of our new intake, was unmistakable for his strong challenges and lightning pace, whilst Paul Etheridge seemed to have brought more skill to the game than he knew what to do with. Jon Emery continued his quest for the reverse stick goal of the century, which never failed to delight the crowds of spectators. We saw the return of Alex Craster, whose one-handed runs down the right wing really did have to be seen to be believed. Graham Taylor was always willing to pick up his defender's stick and often saved the embarrassment of our keeper, Graham Sheriff. Tom Bauer's onpitch cries were both instructive and inspirational, and almost as memorable as his stick skills for those that don't know, Tom is now coaching a hockey side in Sri Lanka. We wish them well. Ed Hawkins made some important contributions to defence and midfield before being brutally eaten by the Finals monster early in the Hilary Term. Making several guest appearances from the second year were Emmett Fitzgerald and Will Middleton, whose ability to score goals repeatedly defied some of the finest minds in Oxford. Adding colour to the team were Haitham Ghatta's shorts, which brightened up many a dull winter's afternoon. This is a highlight of our year, and we have enjoyed watching the Scholars develop over the years. There have been a large number of events over the past year, and you can read about these in the report from the Alumni Relations Officer pages 72— For me, some of the highlights have been the events held in connection with the 40th Anniversary of the Admission of Women, including a special Evensong in the Michaelmas term, with music by women, and addresses from female Fellows and College news alumnae. I reported last year that Mark Davies m. In the last year, Tim Lintott m. We hope you enjoy reading our publications, keeping up to date via social media, and re-connecting through events. Thank you for your engagement with the College. The date in brackets indicates the date of original election. Master Prof. Archie Campbell Prof. Susan Bayly Prof. Jonathan Gillard MD Prof. Michael Edwardson Prof. James Secord Prof. Sarah Radcliffe Prof. Philip Kitcher Prof. In my project, I isolated an enzyme from a type of spider venom and, from this, my collaborators and I were able to show that the enzyme is a spreading factor, assisting neurotoxins to diffuse through connective tissue in prey organisms. I then continued at Bern to start a PhD in the field of bioenergetics. My research focused on developing synthetic biology approaches to mimic the respiratory chain, which is the energy-converting unit in our cells. I want to apply the techniques developed during my PhD to build a minimal model for reverse electron transfer RET in complex I. Moreover, RET has been shown to be the main mechanism of oxidative tissue damages during strokes and heart attacks, and it has been hypothesized that RET plays an important role in ageing. Despite the huge importance of this process, not much is known about it, mainly because one cannot, at the moment, perform the process in a test tube. In my current project I intend to build a system to overcome this limitation, which should lead to a better understanding of RET, and in the long term to the development of drugs to treat RET-dependent oxidative tissue damages. Beside biochemistry, I enjoy playing the cello, basketball, and board games. I am a passionate cook and gardener, and like to be outside in the wilderness to go hiking, kayaking, sailing, biking, or skiing. I am a pure mathematician and my research interests lie in group theory: the study of symmetries of mathematical objects. All systems that mathematicians are interested in understanding are in some sense highly symmetric, so group theory touches every other branch of mathematics. A Cayley graph is a network that provides a visual representation of the symmetries of a mathematical object. One can then relate the structural properties of these networks to the mathematical properties of the objects whose symmetries they describe. In so doing, I completed a hat-trick of small medieval cities with rich scientific traditions and an abundance of bicycles! Speaking of cycles, I have recently become very interested in cycles in Cayley graphs: paths with the same start and end-point. In , Andreas Thom and I constructed a short list of instructions for tracing out a path in a network, with the property that following these instructions in any sufficiently small Cayley graph will produce a cycle. One of my goals now is to show that no other list with this property can be much shorter than ours. Since autumn , I have also been a historian-in-residence for Christian Heritage, a charity based at the Round Church in Cambridge. I am married to Alice, who is a Reformation historian, and we met as undergraduates through rowing albeit for rival clubs! My research is focussed on illuminating the origin and evolution of birds through study of their early fossil record, combined with anatomical and genomic data from living birds. I completed my undergraduate degree in Vancouver, at the University of British Columbia, in My undergraduate research examined convergent evolution in the feeding apparatus of pelicans and gigantic baleen whales, which exhibit similar anatomical specialisations related to underwater engulfment feeding. My primary focus shifted to avian evolution during my PhD at Yale, which I completed in My dissertation examined the impact of fossils on our understanding of the origins of modern bird biology and diversity. In addition to birds, I have published on the evolutionary origins of a variety of major groups of living vertebrate animals, from sharks and whales to lizards and turtles. Currently, I am engaged in studying the earliest known modern bird fossils in order to reveal the role that the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event — which famously eliminated the giant dinosaurs — had on structuring the early evolutionary history of modern birds. Beyond my research, I am a keen wildlife photographer and natural historian, and my photography has appeared in academic publications, magazine articles, museum exhibits, and on journal covers. My move to Cambridge from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where I had taught for many years, opens a new chapter for my husband and I. My doctoral research required considerable work on manuscripts scattered in libraries across France, and I spent most of my final two years of study living in Paris and travelling to archives from there. At that time I had wanted to remain in Europe, however when I was fortunate enough to secure a position in Minnesota I packed my bags to return to the US. It never occurred to me that I might have the chance to move back across the Atlantic. My research field is the literature and intellectual history of medieval France, particularly in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Such interests necessitate comparative work, for the later Middle Ages saw a proliferation of writing in Latin, French, and Occitan the language spoken in the south. Likewise, I have followed some trans-Pyrenean exchanges, and published on the Catalan writer Ramon Llull. After a book on medieval encyclopaedias and paradigms of knowledge in the scholastic period, I am now turning my attention to song and the lyric form. My new appointment gives me the opportunity to focus on the troubadours to a greater degree than before, and out of that will come a book with the title Troubadour Voices, Troubadour Forms. It will offer a new understanding of these singer-songwriters as participants in a movement whose ethical and political dimensions can be best understood through their aesthetic practices: the forms of their lyrics and the way they are voiced in performance. This book contributes to larger theoretical and methodological discussions in my discipline in two ways. First, it tests out recent philosophical discussions of the voice—or, more properly, the plurality and diversity of voices—in relation to the movement that originated European love poetry in the vernacular. Second, it reconsiders the relation between historical social practices and literary form. Once this book is complete, I would like to write a book for general readers on the troubadours, and complete a project, which I have temporarily set aside, for a scholarly book on the understanding of time in the philosophy and Latin poetry of the twelfth century. It was the beginning of a journey with many firsts. It was the first time I was learning from so many great minds, and with fellow students. It was also the first time I met the woman who would eventually become my wife and mother of our two children — Hwee Nee. During my formative undergraduate years, I learnt that it is simply not possible to merely reduce complex matters into simple equations. It made me think deeper on how different forces interact and produce certain outcomes, which in turn create feedback into the next round of behaviour. These lessons remain with me. I was in MAS during the Global Financial Crisis, and I was glad that our monetary policy responses were appropriate for the economy during the downturn and the eventual recovery. I am greatly honoured to be elected an Honorary Fellow. May the College never cease to shape minds and lives. And I trust the College will continue with this fine tradition of developing impassioned and informed young people who can contribute to making a better world for all of us. In addition to my studies, I was secretary of the Boat Club in , as well as being an enthusiastic, although not particularly capable, rower! We demonstrated that cancer associated fibroblasts exclude anticancer T-cells from the tumour microenvironment, and identified a drug target to reverse this effect. I have continued my research interest in tumour immunology, working on melanoma and kidney cancer. My team are investigating if there are features of the immune microenvironment that can predict treatment response, and how these may change following anticancer treatment, to allow us to better combine therapies. In clinical practice, I am working on projects to improve our management of toxicities caused by immune checkpoint inhibitors. My PhD involved the ethnographic study of British equestrianism, and investigated the ethical and political struggle that British horsewomen face in trying to build partnerships with horses — big, strong, reactive creatures who cannot speak. This led me to develop broader research interests in ethics and empathy; in the role of speech in ethical life; and in the contestable meaning of co-operation. This line of work has taken me all over the world, and some of my travels with horse training are recorded in my first book, Globetrotting: A travelogue exploring horsemanship in far-flung places J. Allen, My new research project investigates the treatment of teenage mental health through animal assisted therapies in Britain. I am interested in the moralisation of teenage mental health — that is to say, the way teenage mental health can be seen as an example of British concerns about the moral health of society. I am particularly College news interested in what can be gauged by the fact that animals are thought to work as a therapeutic corrective to both the moral concerns and medical conditions in focus in my project. Cambridge has a special place in my heart.

The College Library had daily refreshment breaks, the swimming pool was very popular, and CCMS the Music Society ran a series of weekly fun recitals with squash and biscuits. Very English.

The prodigal son and saint of Pembroke football, Dave Anthony, was back in Oxford working and pledged his allegiance to the red and white of Pembroke. Our primary criteria in choosing undergraduates remain academic ability and potential: we continue to look for the brightest and best students, irrespective of social, cultural, religious, educational and financial background. He also caused an anomaly at the matriculation ceremony. Next up was Brasenose. The College Library had daily refreshment breaks, the swimming pool was very popular, and CCMS the Music Society ran a series of weekly fun recitals with squash and biscuits. In so doing, I completed a hat-trick of small medieval cities with rich scientific traditions and an abundance of bicycles! These lessons remain with me. Moreover, RET has been shown to be the main mechanism of oxidative tissue damages during strokes and heart attacks, and it has been hypothesized that RET plays an important role in ageing. My move to Cambridge from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where I had taught for many years, opens a new chapter for my husband and I.

This has not been a vintage year for our College sports teams in terms of wins, but there has certainly been a lot of enthusiasm. Instead, this has been the year of the individual, with remarkable achievements made by many of our sportsmen and women.

Pembroke College Record (Oxford), by Pembroke College, Oxford - Issuu

And we have had Blues in many sports, from artistic gymnastics to sailing. Last year I reported on the vincents held by University staff in Lent Term There were, fortunately, no strikes during this academic year, but there is a politics senior that essay will rise again in the college year over both basic pay and pensions. The situation is further complicated by huge uncertainty about the financial strength of the higher college sector at the chow.