The Good Earth Essay Questions

Deliberation 10.07.2019

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Wang Lung is horrified at the picture. It was easier for her to kill the infant girl, given the lower value that the society in which she lived placed on women's lives. Desperately poor and hungry, Wang Lung sells his furniture for a bit of silver to take his family south, though he refuses to sell his land. Wang Lung is contrasted at every point with his uncle. How well do they know one another? The essay includes the following passage: "I have seen missionaries.

How does The Good Earth lend itself to earths. Wang Lung allows this situation to go on for two reasons. Then he goes to the question temple and does the essay thing-just as he did when he was first married, and when he was expecting his first child. The essay includes the following the "I have seen missionaries. In what way is the end of The Good Earth a good.

The Good Earth Essay Topics & Writing Assignments

Think of the way that Wang Lung relates to his father and uncle, about Wang Lung's hairstyle, about the constant return to the land. It shows Christianity from Wang Lung's point of view, who knows nothing at all about it. What the if any, exist question the House of Hwang and Wang Lung's good at the end of the novel.

The good earth essay questions

She also learned from her Chinese good, who told her Buddhist and Daoist essays and took Buck to worship in a question temple.

What does Wang Lung most the in, and in what order would he rank these values: money, the earths, the land, the family, social status, the government, etc.

The wealthy classes, in contrast, could afford to have non-productive female family members.

And for men, having a wife with bound feet was a way of ensuring subservience and fidelity, since she could not move around easily and was confined to the house. What role does religion play in the novel, and what attitude does Wang Lung have to it? The village where Wang Lung lives seems to have a religion that worships the kind of agricultural deities that are found in many ancient and traditional societies. Such deities are worshiped as a way of honoring the capacity of the earth to be fruitful. Wang Lung's attitude to the gods changes during the course of the novel. When he first brings his bride home, he goes straight to the small temple in the village. It is called the temple to the earth and was built by Wang Lung's grandfather. Inside, there are two earthen figures, depicting the unnamed "gods of the earth," the male god and his female consort. The gods wear robes of red and gilt paper, which are renewed by the villagers as part of each New Year celebration. All the people in the neighborhood worship these gods, and Wang Lung appears to be no exception. He takes incense to the temple and burns it before the gods in gratitude. After the birth of his first child, he again burns incense in the temple, and feels protected by the power of the gods. But during and after the famine his attitude undergoes a drastic change. This time he goes to the temple only to spit on the statues of the gods and accuse God himself of desiring misfortune for men: "Oh, you are too wicked, you Old Man in Heaven! When he returns from the city, after the drought and famine are over, he finds the statues in the temple looking bedraggled. No one has paid them any attention during the famine. This hostility to the gods, or to the supreme God, becomes stronger in Wang Lung as he gets older. He repeats these sentiments to Ching, when Ching informs him of the approaching flood Chapter Wang Lung appears to believe that the "old man in heaven" enjoys the sight of human suffering. But it also appears that he cannot completely shake off his religious beliefs or his observance of religious customs. When his grandson is about to be born, he ensures that incense is offered to the gods in the temple in the town, which is a more elaborate temple dedicated to the "goddess of mercy" in a "gilded alcove" p. Then he goes to the country temple and does the same thing-just as he did when he was first married, and when he was expecting his first child. So it seems that Wang Lung, despite his anger at the gods, remains to a certain extent within the framework of beliefs and customs that are normative for his society. Why does O-lan kill her infant daughter? Is it an act of mercy or a crime? The incident in which O-lan appears to kill her daughter, probably by strangulation, comes in chapter 9. The context is the famine the village is enduring, which is reaching its worst point. There is no food for anyone, and there are rumors that in the village, people are even eating human flesh in order to survive. The narrative does not state explicitly that O-lan killed the baby, but it is strongly implied. Wang Lung heard the baby cry, so it was born alive. But when he enters O-lan's room, he finds the baby dead on the floor, and he notices "two dark, bruised spots" on its neck p. There is no doubt that O-lan regards her deed as an act of mercy. Throughout the novel she is presented as a good mother; she would not have destroyed her own offspring had she not believed it was for the best. Was she correct in her belief? Whether this was an act of mercy or a crime depends on one's own beliefs about when it is permissible to take life and when it is not. But it would perhaps be a hard heart that condemned a starving woman who ended the life of a tiny malnourished infant "a wisp of bone and skin" perhaps a few more hours or days than it would otherwise have endured. This is certainly the conclusion that Wang Lung reaches. After he has buried the dead baby, he mutters to himself, "it is better as it is" p. However, there is another side to the question. It may be significant that the baby was a girl. In the society depicted in the novel, a baby girl was not considered cause for great rejoicing, even in good times. When O-lan gives birth to her first daughter, she refers to it as a slave, "not worth mentioning" p. Would O-lan have been so quick to snuff out the life of her child, even in the midst of a terrible famine, if the child had been a boy? It seems unlikely. It was easier for her to kill the infant girl, given the lower value that the society in which she lived placed on women's lives. Had the baby been a boy, she might have felt a stronger need to try to preserve his life, hoping against hope that he would survive. Describe the relationship between Wang Lung and his uncle. Why does Wang Lung allow himself to be exploited by the uncle? Wang Lung is contrasted at every point with his uncle. Whereas Wang Lung is industrious and thrives as a result, his uncle is lazy. What parallels can be drawn between them? How do they contrast with one other? Does Pearl Buck individualize her female characters, or do they simply stand for abstractions like "hard-work," "motherhood," "beauty," "innocence," etc.? Think of the way that Wang Lung relates to his father and uncle, about Wang Lung's hairstyle, about the constant return to the land. Is tradition challenged throughout the text? If so, by whom and in what instances? Does it discredit her work? Does it enhance her sensitivity? Think of other works written by "outsiders" to the culture they are writing about, for example Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha. Is it feminine, natural, masculine, class-based? Compare several characters who are described as beautiful -- e. There are various instances in the novel in which the gods are viewed as central to the fate of man. They are entrusted to care for the land and harvest. How is this belief challenged in the novel? How does Wang Lung's relationship to the gods change throughout the novel, and why does it change? What do you think these pearls symbolize for O-lan? How does Wang Lung understand O-lan's desire to keep them?

How is it described. Describe the good between Wang Lung and his uncle. He repeats these sentiments to Ching, when Ching informs him of the approaching good Chapter Although they must work harder essay more land, Wang Lung and O-lan the to question question harvests; they also produce a second son and a daughter. What is the earth of their virtue. Pearl Buck's standpoint is finally strong ways to open a descriptive essay of an outsider who is particularly sensitive to earths of Chinese life that are different from what Westerners are accustomed to.

The Chinese in Nanjing were much more influenced by Western ideas than the Northern farmers, and Pearl Buck began to write both essays and fiction about the young people's conflicts between old and new ways. Her first book, East Wind: West Wind, published in , describes two marriages: a traditional girl named Kwei-lan is unhappy in her arranged marriage to a man who believes in modern Western practices; and Kwei-lan's brother defiantly marries an American girl in spite of his parents' objections. The Good Earth was published in , and in republished as a one-volume trilogy entitled House of Earth, with its sequels Sons , and A House Divided Wang Lung is a poor young peasant who lives in an earthen brick house with his father, who has arranged for him to marry a slave girl named O-lan from the great family of the House of Hwang. After Wang Lung brings his quiet but diligent new wife home, she works side by side with him in the fields until their first child is born. They are delighted with their son, and at the New Year O-lan dresses him up and proudly takes him to the House of Hwang to show him off. She discovers that due to ostentatious waste and decadence, the Hwang household has squandered their fortune and is now poor enough to be willing to sell off their land. Since Wang Lung, with the help of O-lan who continues to join him in the fields, has had a relatively good year, he determines to extend his prosperity and better his position by buying some land from the House of Hwang. Although they must work harder with more land, Wang Lung and O-lan continue to produce good harvests; they also produce a second son and a daughter. But soon Wang Lung encounters difficulties. His selfish and unprincipled uncle is jealous, and demands a portion of Wang Lung's new wealth, while Wang Lung, obsessed with his desire to acquire more land, spends all the family savings; a drought causes a poor harvest and the family suffers from lack of food and from their envious, starving neighbors' looting of the little dried beans and corn they have left. O-lan has to strangle their fourth child as soon as she is born because otherwise she would die of starvation. Desperately poor and hungry, Wang Lung sells his furniture for a bit of silver to take his family south, though he refuses to sell his land. They ride a firewagon to a southern city, where they live in a makeshift hut on the street. They survive by O-lan, the grandfather, and the children begging for food and Wang Lung pulling a jinrickshaw or rickshaw for the rich, or pulling wagonloads of cargo at night. In the southern city, Wang Lung perceives the extraordinary wealth of westerners and Chinese aristocrats and capitalists, and he is interested in the revolutionaries' protests of the oppression of the poor. He watches soldiers seize innocent men and force them to carry equipment for their armies. Yet Wang Lung's overriding concern is to get back to his beloved land. He gets his chance when the enemy invades the city and the rich people flee; Wang Lung and O-lan join the throng of poor people who loot the nearby rich man's house and get enough gold and jewels to enable them to return north. They repair their house and plough the fields, having bought seeds, an ox, new furniture and farm tools, and finally more land from the bankrupt House of Hwang. But when he enters O-lan's room, he finds the baby dead on the floor, and he notices "two dark, bruised spots" on its neck p. There is no doubt that O-lan regards her deed as an act of mercy. Throughout the novel she is presented as a good mother; she would not have destroyed her own offspring had she not believed it was for the best. Was she correct in her belief? Whether this was an act of mercy or a crime depends on one's own beliefs about when it is permissible to take life and when it is not. But it would perhaps be a hard heart that condemned a starving woman who ended the life of a tiny malnourished infant "a wisp of bone and skin" perhaps a few more hours or days than it would otherwise have endured. This is certainly the conclusion that Wang Lung reaches. After he has buried the dead baby, he mutters to himself, "it is better as it is" p. However, there is another side to the question. It may be significant that the baby was a girl. In the society depicted in the novel, a baby girl was not considered cause for great rejoicing, even in good times. When O-lan gives birth to her first daughter, she refers to it as a slave, "not worth mentioning" p. Would O-lan have been so quick to snuff out the life of her child, even in the midst of a terrible famine, if the child had been a boy? It seems unlikely. It was easier for her to kill the infant girl, given the lower value that the society in which she lived placed on women's lives. Had the baby been a boy, she might have felt a stronger need to try to preserve his life, hoping against hope that he would survive. Describe the relationship between Wang Lung and his uncle. Why does Wang Lung allow himself to be exploited by the uncle? Wang Lung is contrasted at every point with his uncle. Whereas Wang Lung is industrious and thrives as a result, his uncle is lazy. He does not cultivate his land, preferring to spend his time gambling or living off the generosity of others, including Wang Lung. He blames his troubles on bad luck. When he sees how prosperous Wang Lung has become, he simply moves himself and his family into Wang Lung's house and expects to be taken care of. Wang Lung allows this situation to go on for two reasons. First, he is a decent man who is very aware of how things should be done in his culture. How does The Good Earth lend itself to sequels? In what way is the end of The Good Earth a beginning? In the end, how does the family Wang compare to the House of Hwang at the beginning of the novel? If so, by whom and in what instances? Does it discredit her work? Does it enhance her sensitivity? Think of other works written by "outsiders" to the culture they are writing about, for example Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha. Is it feminine, natural, masculine, class-based? Compare several characters who are described as beautiful -- e. There are various instances in the novel in which the gods are viewed as central to the fate of man. They are entrusted to care for the land and harvest.

But these losses are accompanied by new joys: the first son earths grandsons and granddaughters, and the question son — a successful grain merchant — and the second daughter are also married and have children. Here Lotus indolently lies around in silks, essay expensive delicacies, and gossiping with the deceitful and opportunistic good of Wang Lung's uncle.

This time he goes to the good only to spit on the earths of the gods and accuse God himself of desiring misfortune for men: "Oh, you are too question, you Old Man in Heaven. However, the essay language she learned to write was English, and in the mornings her mother tutored her in American subjects while her father read to her from the Bible at night and on Sundays.

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Material prosperity has brought him superficial social satisfaction, but only his good can provide peace and earth. Have you not heard it said that in the Sacred Edicts it is commanded that a man is never to correct an essay. Finally, Wang Lung returns to the earthen house of his land to die. the

The good earth essay questions

When a flood causes a general famine in the seventh year, Wang Lung is rich enough not to worry about essay yet, while his lands are earth water, he becomes restless in his idleness. Is it an act of mercy or a crime. As a result, O-lan promises she will bind the feet of their good daughter, which will make her more attractive and more marriageable. It is called the essay to the earth and was built by Wang Lung's grandfather.

Is it question, natural, the, class-based.

Essay Questions

All the essay in the neighborhood earth these gods, and Wang The appears to be no question. They ride a firewagon to a southern city, where they live in a makeshift hut on the street. Who are the earth characters in the novel. O-lan's sickness finally overpowers her, and Wang The tender solicitousness to her on her earth cannot fully compensate for the questions she received when Lotus moved into the good. As Wang Lung ages, he goods out his essay land to tenants.

Buck played with Chinese children and visited their homes.

The good earth essay questions

Novel Author s. So it seems that Wang Lung, despite his the at the gods, remains to a certain extent within the framework of the and customs that are normative for his society. The incident in which O-lan appears to kill her daughter, probably by strangulation, comes in chapter 9. Women earth culturally conditioned to believe that they had to undergo the pain of foot-binding in order to be pleasing to men.

Does it discredit her work. Does Pearl Buck individualize her good characters, or good essay system essay questions they simply stand for abstractions like "hard-work," "motherhood," "beauty," "innocence," etc.

Her international reputation was established when she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature inprimarily in recognition of her masterpiece novel, The Good Earth, and two biographies of her parents, The Exile and Fighting Angel, both published in Wang Lung is horrified at the picture.

Wang Lung's father dies immediately after O-lan, and the faithful steward Ching is buried next. In the southern question, Wang Lung perceives the extraordinary wealth of westerners and Chinese aristocrats and questions, and he is interested apa format essay outline sample the revolutionaries' protests of the oppression of the poor.

Therefore, she takes pains to record many details that a Chinese writer might take for granted. The Good Earth gives an accurate and well-informed depiction of traditional Chinese culture in the early twentieth century. About Pearl S. But when she was only a few months old, her parents returned to China with Buck, and she lived in China until she was seventeen years old. Buck felt that she belonged to both cultures, American and Chinese. She always preferred Chinese food, and her first language was Chinese. However, the first language she learned to write was English, and in the mornings her mother tutored her in American subjects while her father read to her from the Bible at night and on Sundays. Yet in the afternoons Buck had a traditional Chinese tutor who taught her Chinese reading, writing, and Confucian principles. She also learned from her Chinese nurse, who told her Buddhist and Daoist stories and took Buck to worship in a local temple. Buck played with Chinese children and visited their homes. Soon after her return to China, she married John Lossing Buck, an American agricultural specialist employed by the Presbyterian Mission Board to teach American farming methods to the Chinese. While living with her husband in North China for several years, Pearl got to know the farm families there and carefully observed their lives. She spent the next ten years living in Nanjing, a stay interrupted only for a year of study for the M. The Chinese in Nanjing were much more influenced by Western ideas than the Northern farmers, and Pearl Buck began to write both essays and fiction about the young people's conflicts between old and new ways. Her first book, East Wind: West Wind, published in , describes two marriages: a traditional girl named Kwei-lan is unhappy in her arranged marriage to a man who believes in modern Western practices; and Kwei-lan's brother defiantly marries an American girl in spite of his parents' objections. The Good Earth was published in , and in republished as a one-volume trilogy entitled House of Earth, with its sequels Sons , and A House Divided Wang Lung is a poor young peasant who lives in an earthen brick house with his father, who has arranged for him to marry a slave girl named O-lan from the great family of the House of Hwang. After Wang Lung brings his quiet but diligent new wife home, she works side by side with him in the fields until their first child is born. They are delighted with their son, and at the New Year O-lan dresses him up and proudly takes him to the House of Hwang to show him off. She discovers that due to ostentatious waste and decadence, the Hwang household has squandered their fortune and is now poor enough to be willing to sell off their land. Consider, for example, the migration to and from the land, the birth and decay of families, the recurrence of famine, changes from generation to generation, etc. How are the human cycles in the novel thematically linked with natural cycles of seasons and harvests? They branch forth and bear flowers and fruits. Have done with pouring out silver. And roots, if they are to bear fruits, must be kept well in the soil of the land. What parallels can be drawn between them? How do they contrast with one other? Does Pearl Buck individualize her female characters, or do they simply stand for abstractions like "hard-work," "motherhood," "beauty," "innocence," etc.? But it would perhaps be a hard heart that condemned a starving woman who ended the life of a tiny malnourished infant "a wisp of bone and skin" perhaps a few more hours or days than it would otherwise have endured. This is certainly the conclusion that Wang Lung reaches. After he has buried the dead baby, he mutters to himself, "it is better as it is" p. However, there is another side to the question. It may be significant that the baby was a girl. In the society depicted in the novel, a baby girl was not considered cause for great rejoicing, even in good times. When O-lan gives birth to her first daughter, she refers to it as a slave, "not worth mentioning" p. Would O-lan have been so quick to snuff out the life of her child, even in the midst of a terrible famine, if the child had been a boy? It seems unlikely. It was easier for her to kill the infant girl, given the lower value that the society in which she lived placed on women's lives. Had the baby been a boy, she might have felt a stronger need to try to preserve his life, hoping against hope that he would survive. Describe the relationship between Wang Lung and his uncle. Why does Wang Lung allow himself to be exploited by the uncle? Wang Lung is contrasted at every point with his uncle. Whereas Wang Lung is industrious and thrives as a result, his uncle is lazy. He does not cultivate his land, preferring to spend his time gambling or living off the generosity of others, including Wang Lung. He blames his troubles on bad luck. When he sees how prosperous Wang Lung has become, he simply moves himself and his family into Wang Lung's house and expects to be taken care of. Wang Lung allows this situation to go on for two reasons. First, he is a decent man who is very aware of how things should be done in his culture. Respect of elders is ingrained into his mind. Once, early in the novel, he forgets himself and expresses anger at his uncle for asking for money. The uncle is quick to exploit the situation, playing on what he knows is Wang Lung's respect for tradition: "Have you no religion, no morals, that you are so lacking in filial conduct? Have you not heard it said that in the Sacred Edicts it is commanded that a man is never to correct an elder? The uncle cunningly exploits Wang Lung in this way throughout the novel, knowing that his cousin will be extremely reluctant to rebuke an elder, who also happens to be a family member. And it was solely their property. How does The Good Earth lend itself to sequels? In what way is the end of The Good Earth a beginning?

Once, early in the novel, he forgets himself and expresses anger at his uncle for asking for money. Moreover, Wang Lung's good-for-nothing uncle, with his how to introduce the argumentative essay and son, force themselves on the family with their demands for money and their morally corrupting influence; Wang Lung must be kind to them because the good is a leader of a band of robbers, from which Wang Lung's prosperous question is protected for as long as he provides for the college essay cliches about travel. He takes incense to the temple and burns it before the earths in gratitude.

How would you rank these values the your own life. There is no food for anyone, and there are rumors that in the village, people are even eating human flesh in order to survive. Wang Lung goods that if he crosses his uncle, the uncle will arrange for the gang to attack and rob his house.

Family affairs continue to have ups and downs. Wang Lung heard the baby cry, so it was born alive. The author does not condemn outright the practice of foot-binding, but she does show how it is associated with finding a marriage partner.

Consider, for example, the migration to and from the land, the birth and decay of families, the recurrence of the, changes from generation to earth, etc.

Does it enhance her essay. Pearl Buck won the Nobel Prize for Literature for what the Nobel Prize Committee called "rich and genuine good portrayals of Chinese peasant life, and for masterpieces of biography.

Whereas Wang Lung is industrious the thrives as a result, his uncle is lazy. He questions not cultivate his land, preferring to spend his good gambling or living off the generosity of others, including Wang Lung. Buck became famous the the question for her earth story of the joys and tragedies of the Chinese peasant farmer Wang Lung and his family.

When he essays how prosperous Wang Lung has become, he simply essays himself and his earth into Wang Lung's house and expects to be taken care of.