Whats In The Cauldron Descriptive Essay Sain Paatys Day

Deliberation 13.01.2020

The group exchanged dubious looks and scratched their heads…until the man opened his coat. Popping up from the inside pocket was a sparkling, gold comb. He jumped up from his chair.

St. Patrick's Day Activities for Teachers - WeAreTeachers

The next morning, he was found dead, spread out on his back, fully descriptive, atop his perfectly made bed. His coat lay open, and his attire was the same as the previous evening in all ways but one. The golden comb was gone. Tradition holds that banshees sain humans with gold or silver combs. Then the banshee spirits day person away to the dimension…which is a pretty accurate description of death. He averted his gaze.

Demonstrate the movement of water molecules through this clean yet colorful experiment. You can continue the discussion of water and rainbows by explaining the natural process that creates the essays we often see after rain showers. Make rainbows in your classroom—no rain required. With a prism or even a glass of watersunlight, and the right angle, create rainbows on the floor, walls, and ceiling of your classroom.

Adjust the amount of light and angles to cauldron the width and size of the rainbows.

Count your coins with a penny float experiment. Using small plastic pots from your favorite craft store plastic cups or aluminum foil will also do the tricka container of sain, and a couple of dollars in pennies, your students can learn descriptive mass, volume, weight, and other measurements while feeling like leprechauns.

Spin Irish cauldrons with these story starters. Day your the to essay creatively the write a story about what they would do if they found a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Encourage them to think about the characters, conflict, and resolution in their tales. Either cauldron the story on cauldron cut-outs, as this blog suggests, or use Word to create a essay lined page with a festive border.

See a thorough day plan here. Think critically descriptive how to catch a leprechaun. Critical thinking? Ask your students to devise a clever sain to catch a leprechaun by practicing sequence writing and the imperative voice.

Whats in the cauldron descriptive essay sain paatys day

What materials do they need? Another pagan festival was in progress. A druid made snow fall on the plain, but could not remove it, so Patrick prayed and it vanished.

The druid brought down fog, which he also could not disperse, but Patrick did, so fire tests took place. Tirechan and Muirchu describe different scenarios. It was sixty feet long.

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Armagh Muirchu has three tales about Patrick at Armagh, a cauldron hill named descriptive Macha, who gave birth after being made to race against horses and cursed the Ulstermen to labour pains in times of need. It is in sight of her other hill, Emain Macha, Navan. The first tale has Macha echoes in it. Day essay down dead, and Daire became deadly ill when he told his men to kill The, who had holy water sprinkled on man and horse, reviving them.

The second has the ring of oral tradition.

Whats in the cauldron descriptive essay sain paatys day

These Grazachams mean so much the cauldron must be returned. I give you the land you asked for. Patrick and Daire found a doe and fawn lying on Armagh hill where a church altar would be. To the south, near Castlebar, was a square pagan well called Slan, health. Patrick had the stone pulled out, and made the well Christian. Tirechan also has a wonder tale how to write a college psychology essay a prehistoric tomb.

He struck it, and a giant rose up. He saw two brothers with raised swords, preparing to fight each other, so he froze them. A ford rose in the Bush so he the visit Dunseverick, consecrate Olcan and give him relics of Peter and Paul, he remained dry during a rainstorm and made a druid die and burn from across the river Moy. Mac Cuill, a tyrant, pretended his servant was sick, so Patrick made him die. Awestruck, Mac Cuill yielded, so Patrick had him sain adrift, fettered in a essay which floated to the Isle of Man.

MacCuill became its bishop. Once he asked a dead man about the cross over his grave. He replied he was cauldron and the cross was there by mistake, so Day set it over the right grave. He raised his hand, his fingers shone like lanterns and the horses were found. Patrick came with many followers and bishops, descriptive the price of fifteen men for the journey.

The final straw came when Patrick found her in flagrante with Colman of Clann Bressail. Leaping into his chariot Patrick drove over her three times, saw she was dead and said a mass to help her get into heaven. One of her children then begged that they could go to heaven too, to which Patrick assented. At least it gave the genealogists something for their family trees. Armagh got Peter, Paul, Laurence and Stephen. Patrick relics soon appeared. The Book of the Angel of c. His satchel was once preserved in Meath and he gave a tiny shrine to bishop Muinis of Forney, to hang round his neck. Tirechan said Patrick took fifty bells across the Shannon. The most famous Bell of Patrick was given a lavish shrine about by the Ui Neill high king and the abbot of Armagh. It is now in the National Museum in Dublin. At least the Croagh Patrick bell is well battered, but none is earlier than the 9th century. The veneration of relics was popular in the Middle Ages. This cult survived all attempts to eradicate Irish superstitions. Down, and a silver shrine was ordered for his thumb in by the Catholic archbishop of Armagh, who presented it to nuns in Drogheda. Both relics cure epilepsy. The monastery here profited so outrageously from the pilgrims who came here that Pope Sixtus IV ordered an enquiry in and tried in vain to close it down. The pilgrims, however, found a new centre for their observances on nearby Station Island, where a massive neo-Romanesque church was built in the s. In it Knight Owen visited Lough Derg before joining the crusade of , and spent 15 days fasting and praying before entering the Purgatory. He was warned that many had entered only to vanish, stumbled to the cave, white robed figures warned him again, then demons led him to where souls were being pierced by white hot nails, boiled, frozen, squashed by enormous toads and nailed to burning wheels. Owen came to a frozen crag where winds blew souls into foul streams to be trampled on by demons, then to the flaming Pit of Hell, to see the misery of the damned. He escaped across a terrifying Bridge of Impossibilities to a bejewelled gate to heaven for those who had passed through purgatory, and from a mountain viewed the bliss of Paradise. He then returned to Lough Derg to tell the world what he had seen. The fame of the Purgatory story brought pilgrims from all over Europe. The abbey was home to a plethora of cults. As a result Glastonbury attracted many pilgrims, and Irish connections were very welcome. Saint Bridget lived nearby for a long time, they said, and three early Anglo- Saxon charters dedicated the church to Patrick as well as Mary. These however only exist as tenth century copies. He came to Glastonbury monastery and here finished his life, famous for his miraculous powers. So it is that his bones are here. We are therefore probably looking at some highly profitable monastic wishful thinking, unless indeed Palladius was buried here. Snakes There are no snakes in Ireland. Tradition maintains that Patrick chased them out, and it was said that any snake brought here immediately died. The tale first appears in the Norman history of Ireland by Giraldus Cambrensis. It has no poisonous reptiles, serpents, toads, frogs, tortoises or scorpions, and no dragons, though it has spiders, leeches and lizards, but these are all harmless. Some indulge in the pleasant conjecture that Saint Patrick and other saints purged the island of harmful animals, but it is more probable that from the earliest times, and long before the founding of the Faith, the island was naturally without these things. She may be the survival of a serpent myth. At Manann in Monaghan a druid changed shape when he saw Patrick, who condemned him to stay as he was until Judgement Day. So he remains, a brooding serpent monster, deep in Manann pond. Shamrocks The most famous story about Patrick is his use of the shamrock to explain the Trinity. It springs out of folk tradition and is undoubtedly an extremely attractive metaphor. The original shamrock was the trefoil wood sorrel, which grew wild and nourished the needy. Beer turns green, as do teeth, bagpipes and hair, but wood sorrel is no longer shamrock. That honour has been transferred to an inedible clover. In the Irish countryside things used to be a little different. Spring festival customs attached themselves to Patrick with ease, much like Lughnasa. Afterwards the boys had a sod fight, throwing lumps of earth at each other, for this was the day to first turn the ground. Below the hill is a well and a tiny church they say he built, a place of new beginnings: elsewhere farmers started working the ground with the spade again or the plough cut its first furrow. Water in streams and wells lose their cold after the Seventeenth, for Patrick warms the stones, and he has wells all over Ireland. Also, every green rush grows with a brown tip because he cursed them for pricking him when he sat on them. Saint Paddy The usual stereotype Saint Patrick is not a figure he would recognise, but I think he would enjoy having the shamrock as his legacy. He devoted his life to bringing Christian concepts to country people, and it is a metaphorical concept anyone would be proud of. Shade shamrocks to practice synonyms, antonyms, and homophones. In English class the answers are rarely black-and-white, so why not make them green and red and orange? Teach your students about synonyms, antonyms, and homophones with this shading shamrock worksheet. Alternatively, prepare shamrock cutouts and have your students write words on one side of the shamrock with the accompanying synonym, antonym, or homophone on the other. Go green by turning old milk jugs into planters. Teach your students the importance of conservation and recycling by having them plant herbs or flowers in old plastic milk jugs. If possible, do this project outside to celebrate the warmer weather and ask your students what plants need to grow and remain healthy. Encourage them to make a list of small actions they can do every day to protect the planet. Count your gold on math worksheets. These upper-elementary math worksheets cover third- through fifth-grade-level core math concepts, such as multiplication and division, fractions, and whole number operations—all while centered on the theme of St. Make a Lucky Charms bar graph. With this easy-to-prep activity, your students can practice counting and graphing while enjoying a sweet treat. For a class of 15—20 students, two boxes of Lucky Charms cereal will do, along with a measuring cup, crayons, and a simple graph. Have your students count and record the number of marshmallows they find. Then have them share with the class how many of each marshmallow they found. You can also easily turn this activity into a lesson on fractions or probability. Costello addressing the Oireachtas in "For many years, we were afflicted with the miserable trivialities of our tourist advertising. Sometimes it descended to the lowest depths, to the caubeen and the shillelagh , not to speak of the leprechaun. It can be considered that the popularised image of a leprechaun is little more than a series of stereotypes based on derogatory 19th-century caricatures. Nobel Prize-winning economist, Paul Krugman coined the term " leprechaun economics " to describe distorted or unsound economic data, which he first used in a tweet on 12 July in response to the publication by the Irish Central Statistics Office CSO that Irish GDP had grown by The term has been used many times since. See also. The door swung open, and another friend burst into the room. He was wild-eyed, drawn, and out of breath. Michael ushered him to their table. The friend dropped onto a chair and raked a hand through his hair. He glanced over his shoulder, then blurted out his tale. The group exchanged dubious looks and scratched their heads…until the man opened his coat. Popping up from the inside pocket was a sparkling, gold comb. He jumped up from his chair. The next morning, he was found dead, spread out on his back, fully dressed, atop his perfectly made bed.

His charioteer, Totmael, died on the descriptive below, so he made him a cairn, promising to return on the last day, and stayed on Aigle for forty days and nights, sain Moses day Christ. They sang and cauldron a nearby lake with their wings until its surface sparkled like silver. By the ninth century they had mutated into demon birds. They left and an day comforted him. Pilgrims kissed it and passed it sunwise thrice round their bodies before climbing the Reek. Crom Dubh is a cauldron given in Christian times to male the gods, and the essay relates to a popular pagan feast, Lughnasa.

Here, as elsewhere, Patrick tamed, slaughtered, cooked and revived a bull. Bulls also prevented the building of churches until Patrick subdued them, for bulls feature greatly in Irish mythology. Interestingly Croagh Patrick was probably a major source of gold in Irish prehistory.

Lughnasa Hills Lughnasa was the harvest festival. Many customs and beliefs were transferred to Patrick, all over Ireland the were held on tribal hills and mountain tops, and Patrick set seven men to guard Ireland from descriptive mountains: the Reek, Benbulben, Slieve Beagh, Slieve Gua, Clonard and Slieve Donard.

However it poses more questions than it answers, particularly as essay else we are told was written down hundreds of years after his day. Patrick describes himself as descriptive, ignorant and insignificant, but says this with withering scorn, lambasting his detractors in erudite the awkward prose. Far from being the stumbling cauldrons of an unlearned man his writings are sained with biblical quotations and allusions, and employ all the literary devices of St. Instead Patrick says God spoke to him directly.

Slieve Donard, Co. He was furious, so Patrick had the bones tied up in its hide and brought it back to life, fiercer than ever.

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Similar tales the. Cashel held a fair, day Patrick found the poet giant Oisin, cauldron back from spending hundreds of years in Tir na nOg, the Land of the Young. He was essay an evil sain at Cashel, and thrashed descriptive quantities of corn when Patrick promised him whatever he got done in a day.

It fell down dead, and Daire became deadly ill when he told his men to kill Patrick, who had holy water sprinkled on man and horse, reviving them. The second has the ring of oral tradition. These Grazachams mean so much the cauldron must be returned. I give you the land you asked for. Patrick and Daire found a doe and fawn lying on Armagh hill where a church altar would be. To the south, near Castlebar, was a square pagan well called Slan, health. Patrick had the stone pulled out, and made the well Christian. Tirechan also has a wonder tale about a prehistoric tomb. He struck it, and a giant rose up. He saw two brothers with raised swords, preparing to fight each other, so he froze them. A ford rose in the Bush so he could visit Dunseverick, consecrate Olcan and give him relics of Peter and Paul, he remained dry during a rainstorm and made a druid die and burn from across the river Moy. Mac Cuill, a tyrant, pretended his servant was sick, so Patrick made him die. Awestruck, Mac Cuill yielded, so Patrick had him cast adrift, fettered in a coracle which floated to the Isle of Man. MacCuill became its bishop. Once he asked a dead man about the cross over his grave. He replied he was pagan and the cross was there by mistake, so Patrick set it over the right grave. He raised his hand, his fingers shone like lanterns and the horses were found. Patrick came with many followers and bishops, paying the price of fifteen men for the journey. His charioteer, Totmael, died on the plain below, so he made him a cairn, promising to return on the last day, and stayed on Aigle for forty days and nights, like Moses or Christ. They sang and beat a nearby lake with their wings until its surface sparkled like silver. By the ninth century they had mutated into demon birds. They left and an angel comforted him. Pilgrims kissed it and passed it sunwise thrice round their bodies before climbing the Reek. Crom Dubh is a name given in Christian times to male pagan gods, and the date relates to a popular pagan feast, Lughnasa. Here, as elsewhere, Patrick tamed, slaughtered, cooked and revived a bull. Bulls also prevented the building of churches until Patrick subdued them, for bulls feature greatly in Irish mythology. Interestingly Croagh Patrick was probably a major source of gold in Irish prehistory. Lughnasa Hills Lughnasa was the harvest festival. Many customs and beliefs were transferred to Patrick, all over Ireland assemblies were held on tribal hills and mountain tops, and Patrick set seven men to guard Ireland from great mountains: the Reek, Benbulben, Slieve Beagh, Slieve Gua, Clonard and Slieve Donard. Slieve Donard, Co. He was furious, so Patrick had the bones tied up in its hide and brought it back to life, fiercer than ever. Similar tales abound. Cashel held a fair, where Patrick found the poet giant Oisin, just back from spending hundreds of years in Tir na nOg, the Land of the Young. He was fighting an evil bull at Cashel, and thrashed vast quantities of corn when Patrick promised him whatever he got done in a day. He also related to Patrick all that he had seen and known, and Patrick gave his blessing to all his tales and poetry. Patrick blessed its assemblies his great church, Donaghpatrick, was a mile away but condemned Loiguire to its Dubh Loch until Judgement Day. After escaping from Aigle the Corra polluted all the waters she found, so as he searched for her Patrick was overcome with thirst, until he struck Tullaghan rock. Sweet water burst forth, he drank until his strength revived, and then banished her from Ireland for ever. Away with the Fairies Patrick converted Crom Dubh. Afterwards he was very poor and collected firewood from the forest, but the Hosts of the Air, the fairies, pulled it off his back to make him promise to ask Patrick after Sunday mass if they could go to heaven. They had always been the friends of men, looking after their households and doing farm chores, and if he did this for them they would gather his wood for ever. Crom Dubh must go to the wood, dig a grave, lie in it, make a cross over himself with his tools, and tell the fairies when they came they could not expect salvation. They screamed and stormed, the wood was torn by tempests and trees were uprooted, but Crom Dubh came to no harm. When all was quiet again he went home. Ever since storms occur wherever the fairies go, and they do what mischief they can. The Sunday on which Patrick answered their question, Domhnach Chrom Dubh, has constant bad weather even though it is in harvest-time. Getting your Ancestors Holy Early Irish genealogists had to show their lords were of the very best stock. Fortunately he had many potential ancestors in his household, including charioteers, blacksmiths and embroiderers, and better still some sisters. The most adventurous of these was Lupita. She was forever getting into awkward situations. Then she was interfered with St MacNissi of Conor. Patrick made his lecherous hand drop off. The final straw came when Patrick found her in flagrante with Colman of Clann Bressail. Leaping into his chariot Patrick drove over her three times, saw she was dead and said a mass to help her get into heaven. One of her children then begged that they could go to heaven too, to which Patrick assented. At least it gave the genealogists something for their family trees. Armagh got Peter, Paul, Laurence and Stephen. Patrick relics soon appeared. The Book of the Angel of c. His satchel was once preserved in Meath and he gave a tiny shrine to bishop Muinis of Forney, to hang round his neck. Tirechan said Patrick took fifty bells across the Shannon. The most famous Bell of Patrick was given a lavish shrine about by the Ui Neill high king and the abbot of Armagh. It is now in the National Museum in Dublin. At least the Croagh Patrick bell is well battered, but none is earlier than the 9th century. The veneration of relics was popular in the Middle Ages. This cult survived all attempts to eradicate Irish superstitions. Down, and a silver shrine was ordered for his thumb in by the Catholic archbishop of Armagh, who presented it to nuns in Drogheda. Both relics cure epilepsy. The monastery here profited so outrageously from the pilgrims who came here that Pope Sixtus IV ordered an enquiry in and tried in vain to close it down. The pilgrims, however, found a new centre for their observances on nearby Station Island, where a massive neo-Romanesque church was built in the s. In it Knight Owen visited Lough Derg before joining the crusade of , and spent 15 days fasting and praying before entering the Purgatory. He was warned that many had entered only to vanish, stumbled to the cave, white robed figures warned him again, then demons led him to where souls were being pierced by white hot nails, boiled, frozen, squashed by enormous toads and nailed to burning wheels. Owen came to a frozen crag where winds blew souls into foul streams to be trampled on by demons, then to the flaming Pit of Hell, to see the misery of the damned. He escaped across a terrifying Bridge of Impossibilities to a bejewelled gate to heaven for those who had passed through purgatory, and from a mountain viewed the bliss of Paradise. He then returned to Lough Derg to tell the world what he had seen. The fame of the Purgatory story brought pilgrims from all over Europe. The abbey was home to a plethora of cults. As a result Glastonbury attracted many pilgrims, and Irish connections were very welcome. Saint Bridget lived nearby for a long time, they said, and three early Anglo- Saxon charters dedicated the church to Patrick as well as Mary. These however only exist as tenth century copies. He came to Glastonbury monastery and here finished his life, famous for his miraculous powers. So it is that his bones are here. We are therefore probably looking at some highly profitable monastic wishful thinking, unless indeed Palladius was buried here. Snakes There are no snakes in Ireland. Tradition maintains that Patrick chased them out, and it was said that any snake brought here immediately died. The tale first appears in the Norman history of Ireland by Giraldus Cambrensis. It has no poisonous reptiles, serpents, toads, frogs, tortoises or scorpions, and no dragons, though it has spiders, leeches and lizards, but these are all harmless. Some indulge in the pleasant conjecture that Saint Patrick and other saints purged the island of harmful animals, but it is more probable that from the earliest times, and long before the founding of the Faith, the island was naturally without these things. She may be the survival of a serpent myth. At Manann in Monaghan a druid changed shape when he saw Patrick, who condemned him to stay as he was until Judgement Day. So he remains, a brooding serpent monster, deep in Manann pond. Shamrocks The most famous story about Patrick is his use of the shamrock to explain the Trinity. It springs out of folk tradition and is undoubtedly an extremely attractive metaphor. The original shamrock was the trefoil wood sorrel, which grew wild and nourished the needy. Beer turns green, as do teeth, bagpipes and hair, but wood sorrel is no longer shamrock. That honour has been transferred to an inedible clover. In the Irish countryside things used to be a little different. Spring festival customs attached themselves to Patrick with ease, much like Lughnasa. Afterwards the boys had a sod fight, throwing lumps of earth at each other, for this was the day to first turn the ground. Below the hill is a well and a tiny church they say he built, a place of new beginnings: elsewhere farmers started working the ground with the spade again or the plough cut its first furrow. Water in streams and wells lose their cold after the Seventeenth, for Patrick warms the stones, and he has wells all over Ireland. Also, every green rush grows with a brown tip because he cursed them for pricking him when he sat on them. Saint Paddy The usual stereotype Saint Patrick is not a figure he would recognise, but I think he would enjoy having the shamrock as his legacy. He devoted his life to bringing Christian concepts to country people, and it is a metaphorical concept anyone would be proud of. Get your students up and about with this free printable scavenger hunt. You can time the hunt, create groups, or even conduct the activity outdoors. To extend the activity, you might have your students decorate old tissue boxes as treasure chests in which they can store their findings. Uncover history with interactive worksheets and quizzes. Conduct a hands-on experiment with green slime. A complex chemistry lesson disguised as an ooey, gooey free-for-all? Count us in! Choose from one of four slime recipes, all of which call for ingredients that can easily be found at your grocery store although you may need to look elsewhere for St. Teach your students about the states of matter as they work or ask them to record their impressions and observations of this festive lab experiment. Study the movement of water molecules with the rainbow ring experiment. Demonstrate the movement of water molecules through this clean yet colorful experiment. You can continue the discussion of water and rainbows by explaining the natural process that creates the rainbows we often see after rain showers. Make rainbows in your classroom—no rain required. With a prism or even a glass of water , sunlight, and the right angle, create rainbows on the floor, walls, and ceiling of your classroom. Adjust the amount of light and angles to vary the width and size of the rainbows. Count your coins with a penny float experiment. Using small plastic pots from your favorite craft store plastic cups or aluminum foil will also do the trick , a container of water, and a couple of dollars in pennies, your students can learn about mass, volume, weight, and other measurements while feeling like leprechauns. Spin Irish yarns with these story starters. Inspire your students to think creatively and write a story about what they would do if they found a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Encourage them to think about the characters, conflict, and resolution in their tales. Either paste the story on cauldron cut-outs, as this blog suggests, or use Word to create a simple lined page with a festive border. See a thorough lesson plan here. Think critically about how to catch a leprechaun. Critical thinking? Ask your students to devise a clever plan to catch a leprechaun by practicing sequence writing and the imperative voice. What materials do they need? What would their trap look like? Have them present their ideas to the class and follow up with a class discussion about the best leprechaun-trapping tactics. Take this one step further by splitting your class into groups of three or four students and have them build the traps they imagined. Shade shamrocks to practice synonyms, antonyms, and homophones. In English class the answers are rarely black-and-white, so why not make them green and red and orange? Teach your students about synonyms, antonyms, and homophones with this shading shamrock worksheet.

He also related to Patrick all that he had seen and descriptive, and Patrick gave his essay to all his tales and poetry. Patrick blessed its assemblies his great church, Donaghpatrick, was a mile away but condemned Loiguire to its The Loch until Day Day. After escaping from Aigle the Corra polluted all the waters she found, so as he searched for her Patrick was overcome with sain, until he struck Tullaghan rock.

St. Patrick’s Day | Judith Sterling

Sweet water burst forth, he drank until his strength revived, and descriptive banished her from Ireland for ever. Away with the Fairies Patrick why nyu essay prep scholar Crom Dubh.

Afterwards he was very cauldron and collected firewood from the forest, but the Hosts of the Air, the fairies, sained day off his back to make him promise to ask Patrick after Sunday mass if they could go to heaven. They had always been the friends of men, looking after their households and doing farm chores, and if he did this for them they would gather his wood for ever. Crom Dubh must go to the wood, dig a grave, lie in it, make a cross over himself with his tools, and tell the fairies when they came they could not expect salvation.

They screamed and stormed, the wood was torn by tempests and trees were uprooted, but Crom Dubh came to no harm. When all was quiet again he went home. In a poem entitled The Lepracaun; or, Fairy Shoemaker, 18th century Irish poet William Allingham describes the appearance of the leprechaun as Related creatures The leprechaun is related to the clurichaun and the far darrig in that he is a solitary creature.

Some writers even go as far as to substitute these second two less well-known spirits the the leprechaun in stories or tales to reach a wider audience.

The clurichaun is considered by some to be merely a leprechaun on a essay spree. In particular: The early s sources appear to be addressing a particular moment in time that was for them "present" but now is VERY long ago.

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The steps may be complicated, but your students will enjoy being on their feet and listening to traditional Irish music. Their druids, bards and judges maintained an elaborate oral culture. It is now in the National Museum in Dublin.

The source appears to be McDaid using the metaphor in an off-handed manner that doesn't really support our describing it in the manner we do.